Click to Subscribe & Stay Informed via Email!

Subscribe Here!

Subscribe and stay informed about our latest news and events!
  • Please List your Professional Affiliation
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 Venue Information



CGIS South, S354


1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138





Events at this Venue


Mon, April 24, 2017 from 12:00pm - 1:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

“Our Clothes, Our Hair, We Don’t Care”: Prince and the British South Asian misfits

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Hasit Shah, Research Affiliate, Harvard South Asia Institute

Chair: Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

When Prince passed away in April 2016, at the age of just 57, many people felt profound sadness at the loss of an artist whose performative genius was such that people from all backgrounds and lifestyles felt included in his world. SAI Research Affiliate Hasit Shah – journalist, Londoner and Prince fan – explores the connections between a group of second-generation British South Asians and a musician they too claimed as one of their own.

This event was originally scheduled for April 12. 

START
Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 1:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0424_Hasit
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, October 7, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Subalternity and Resistance in India’s Bhil Heartland: Historical Trajectories, Contemporary Scenarios

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Alf Nilsen, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Bergen

Chair: Ajantha Subramanian, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

This paper aims to contribute to discussions of subaltern politics in contemporary India through an investigation of the character and trajectory of democratic mobilisation among Bhil Adivasis in western Madhya Pradesh. Grounded in a critical dialogue with recent Foucauldian approaches to the study of popular politics in India, this paper explores how subalternity is simultaneously constituted and contested in and through state-society relations. The first part of the paper outlines the contours of contemporary Adivasi subalternity in the Bhil heartland of western India, focusing in particular on the “everyday tyranny” of the local state. I then show how the historical origins of Bhil political subalternity can be traced to the restructuring of sovereignty that occurred across the tribal heartland of western India under as a result of colonial state-making projects that unfolded from the end of the Anglo-Maratha wars onwards, and how the power relations that were constituted in this process were reproduced in western Madhya Pradesh after independence. The third and final part of the paper analyzes the ways in which Bhil social movements in the region mobilized to democratize local state-society relations in the 1980s and 1990s. I read this resistance as revolving around forms of legalism from below which produced the rudiments of a civil society and an insurgent form of citizenship centred on collective resource control and self-determination. In conclusion, I reflect on what conceptual lessons the trajectories of these movements hold for the study of subalterity, resistance, and state-society relations in India today.

 

 

START
Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

1007 Nilsen
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, September 30, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Governance for Development — Political and Administrative Reforms for Bangladesh

Book Talk

S. Nazrul Islam, Senior Economic Affairs Officer, Development Policy Analysis Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations

Chair: Prithwiraj Choudhury, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Analyzing Bangladesh’s governance problems and drawing insights that will be relevant to other developing countries, this book sharpens our understanding of governance and suggests political and administrative reforms to improve governance and facilitate faster development.

Book sale to follow.

START
Fri, Sep 30, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 30, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0930 Islam
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, September 26, 2016 from 03:30pm - 05:00pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Grant Opportunities Open House

Student Event

Come learn about SAI summer funding opportunities from past grant recipients. Learn about the various types of grants (research, internship, language), the application process, how to write an appropriate budget for a summer in South Asia, and enjoy some delicious South Asian food.

Learn more about grant opportunities.

Facebook event.

START
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 03:30pm

END
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 05:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

1026 Open House_ - Copy
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, September 16, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Directive Principles and Transformative Constitutional Design

Book Talk

Tarunabh KhaitanAssociate Professor and Hackney Fellow in Law, Wadham College, University of Oxford

Chair: Ajantha SubramanianProfessor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Borrowing and developing the concept from Ireland, framers of India’s Constitution inserted a chapter titled ‘directive principles of state policy’ in the founding document. They were a mix of principles aimed at securing what they called an ‘economic democracy’, some guarantees we now call ‘social rights’ and some other curiosities like an exhortation for prohibition and a ban on cow slaughter. These were directed at the political organs of the state and made expressly non-justiciable. Despite being derided by scholars and lawyers as ‘mere pious wishes’ and ‘design flaws’, and (largely) rejected by post-Apartheid South Africa after due consideration, they have been adopted by at least 24 constitutions in Asia and Africa, including very recently by the latest Nepalese Constitution of 2015. India’s cultural influence on these jurisdictions, mostly in the global South, does not seem to provide sufficient explanation for their continued popularity with constitution makers.

Most of the existing scholarship on directive principles has focused on how courts have used these principles, their non-justiciability notwithstanding. In this paper, Khaitan focus on their political character. First, he uses India as a case-study to argue that directive principles are an important tool for successful constitution-making. He identifies the reasons why they became attractive to the framers of the Indian Constitution, and far from being mere pious wishes, they performed important and distinct political functions for the framers. Second, Khaitan shows that insofar as they impose political duties on the state, these duties have a conditional character: their substantive obligatory force becomes manifest only after certain preconditions inherent in reasons for their adoption as directive principles are satisfied. Extrapolating from these Indian findings, he speculates that non-justiciable conditional political duties have particular salience for postcolonial pluralistic societies in the global South seeking to establish a transformative constitutional culture.

START
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0823 Khaitan
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, April 25, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Music and Satire in Pakistan

Muslim Societies in South Asia and Art Seminar

Ali Aftab Saeed with Saad Sultan, Musicians

Chair: Ali AsaniProfessor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Satire is one of the most prominent forms of expression in Pakistani art. Most of the television hits that have surfaced in Pakistan’s rich art industry have been predicated around satire and have received great plaudits from critics and viewers alike. Musical satire is appealing, as the melody is intriguing for the listeners, and even if they don’t always agree with the message. Saeed and Sultan will discuss the role of musical satire in Pakistan, as well as the creation of their band, Beygairat Brigade, whose hits like “Dhinak Dhinak” and “Aalu Anday” have spread awareness while also entertaining audiences.

About Ali Aftab Saeed with Saad Sultan:

Ali Aftab Saeed is a singer, songwriter, performer, producer, activist, and one of the most influential artists working in Pakistan today. Saeed, and his band Beygairat Brigade, first electrified the Pakistani music scene with their song “Alu Andey” (Potatoes and Eggs) in 2011, a pop song infused with biting political criticism of the Pakistani government in the wake of the assassination of the moderate governor of Punjab Province, Salman Taseer. The video was a viral hit, and Saeed and his bandmates quickly became international news, with interviews and extensive discussions of the impact of their music and message appearing in mainstream media across Pakistan and India, as well as American media outlets such as the New York Times and Voice of America. The band has followed up with several more well-received tracks since, each one even more targeted in its satirical social and political critique.

Saeed has recently released the collaborative album Gao Suno Badlo (Sing Listen Change), featuring tracks and videos dedicated to such issues as women’s empowerment and equal access to education, to extraordinary critical acclaim. His current project focuses on recruiting promising young musicians at colleges and universities across Pakistan to collaborate an on album of peace songs combatting the radicalization of Pakistan. His production agency, Mishermayl will provide these young musicians with professional training and logistical support to record, shoot music videos, and launch them on social media.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program

 

START
Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0425 Final Poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, April 18, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

This Divided Island

Book Talk

Samanth Subramanian, Author

Chair: Charles Hallisey, Yehan Numata Senior Lecturer on Buddhist Literatures, Harvard Divinity School

In the summer of 2009, the leader of the Tamil Tigers was killed, bringing to a bloody end the stubborn and complicated civil war in Sri Lanka. For nearly thirty years it had stretched its fingers: into the bustle of Colombo, through Buddhist monasteries scattered across the island, up the soft hills of central Sri Lanka, down the curves of the eastern coast near Batticaloa and Trincomalee, and over the stark, hot north. Samanth Subramanian gives us an extraordinary account of this great modern conflict and the lives it changed. Taking us to the ghosts of summers past, he draws out the story of Sri Lanka today—an exhausted, disturbed society, still caught in the embers. This Divided Island is a harrowing and humane investigation by one of India’s finest narrative journalists.

 

START
Mon, Apr 18, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 18, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Tue, April 5, 2016 from 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Techno-networks and Urban Space in Bombay Cinema

Urbanization Seminar

Ranjani Mazumdar, Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

This paper looks at the role of media and communication technologies in the imagination of urban spaces in contemporary Bombay cinema. If surveillance practices and their resultant structuring becomes one part of this imagination (No Smoking 2007, LSD 2010, Ugly, 2013), we also see the role of the internet and social media in the framing of spatial encounters in small town India (Masaan 2015). A fascination for ‘obsolete’ technology frames another order of space linked to the recent past (Gangs of Wasseypur 2012, Miss Lovely 2012, Dum Lagake Haisha, 2015), while documentary films like John and Jayne (2005) invoke the call centre imagination within a fractured urban subjectivity. In these films, the themes of violence, love, tragedy and comedy are enacted within a spatial terrain triggered by new media technologies. Taken together these films offer a new geography of the experiential changes unraveling in contemporary India.

Ranjani Mazumdar is Professor of Cinema Studies at the School of Arts & Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Her publications focus on urban cultures, popular cinema, gender and the cinematic city. She is the author of Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City (2007) and co-author with Nitin Govil of the forthcoming The Indian Film Industry. She has also worked as a documentary filmmaker and her productions include Delhi Diary 2001 and The Power of the Image (Co-Directed). Her current research focuses on globalization and film culture, the visual culture of film posters and the intersection of technology, travel, design and colour in 1960s Bombay Cinema.

START
Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 6:30 pm

END
Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 8:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0405 mazumdar final_
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, March 28, 2016 from 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S354

India: the Urban Transition

Urbanization Seminar 

Henrik Valeur, Architect-Urbanist, Founder and Creative Director of UiD

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Can India use urbanization as a driver of economic, human and social development like China has done? How can Indian cities be made more inclusive, productive and livable? Are there any simple solutions to the seemingly insurmountable problems of urban India – the life threatening levels of air pollution, the desperate lack of water, the precarious food situation, the squalid living conditions in the slums, the chaotic, choked and congested road traffic? This lecture will discuss some of these problems and propose some possible solutions, using the cities of Bangalore in South India and Chandigarh in North India as its primary cases. The concept of smart cities will briefly be discussed and co-evolution and development urbanism will be introduced as alternative strategies.

START
Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 6:30 pm

END
Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 8:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0328 valeur FINAL
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn