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Events at this Venue


Mon, November 14, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Pipe Politics: Mumbai’s Contested Waters 

Urbanization Seminar

Lisa BjorkmanAssistant Professor of Urban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

In the Indian city of Mumbai, two dazzling decades of urban development and roaring economic growth have presided over the steady deterioration – and sometimes spectacular breakdown – of the city’s water infrastructures. Water troubles plague not only the more-than 60% of city residents now reported to live in ‘slums,’ but city elites as well have seen their taps grow increasingly erratic and prone to drying up. The everyday risks of water shortage that infuse the city’s water infrastructures– risks that flow across class lines – are managed and mitigated through the forging and maintenance of elaborate knowledge-exchange networks. Getting water to come out of Mumbai’s pipes is an activity that requires continuous attention to and intimate knowledge of a complex and dynamic social and political hydraulic landscape. Ethnographic attention reveals how water is made to flow by means of intimate forms of knowledge and ongoing intervention in the city’s complex and dynamic social, political, and hydraulic landscape. The everyday work of getting water animates and inhabits a penumbra of infrastructural activity – of business, brokerage, secondary markets and socio-political networks – whose workings are transforming lives as well as reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city. Mumbai’s illegible and volatile hydrologies are lending infrastructures increasing political salience just as actual control over pipes and flows becomes contingent upon dispersed and intimate assemblages of knowledge, power, and material authority.

START
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Wednesday Draft
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Thu, October 27, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Gender Challenges

Book Talk

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Development Economics and Environment at the University of Manchester

Pauline PetersFellow, African Studies Center, Faculty Affiliate, Center for International Development, Harvard University.

Chair: Jacqueline BhabhaFXB Director of Research; Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Lecturer in Law, Harvard Law School; Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School

This panel will discuss Gender Challenges, a three-volume compendium by Professor Bina Agarwal, who is known for her path-breaking writings on agriculture, property rights, and the environment. The compendium brings together a selection of her essays, written over three decades, and is published by Oxford University Press, 2016. Combining diverse disciplines, methodologies, and cross-country comparisons, the essays challenge standard economic analysis and assumptions from a gender perspective. They provide original insights on a wide range of theoretical, empirical, and policy issues of continuing importance in contemporary debates.

START
Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1027 Agrawal Poster_
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Fri, April 29, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

New Urbanism and Post-national Modernity: Capital, People and the State in Gurgaon, India

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Sanjay Srivastava, Professor of Sociology, JNU, Delhi

Chair:  Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

This paper focuses upon new urban developments in India and suggests that an ethnographic account of this context provides fruitful insights into contemporary relationships between the state, the ‘people’ and capital. The paper is organized around historical and ethnographic accounts of the privately developed DLF City in the North Indian state of Haryana. DLF City borders Delhi and is part of an area known as the National capital Region (NCR). In principle, a government body known as the National capital Region Planning Board is meant to oversee coordinated infrastructure and other forms of planning processes for the Region. In practice, urban processes within the NCR depend  upon erratic relationships between real estate behemoths, the state and a variety of residents associations. This discussion proceeds through introducing the concepts of ‘post-national modernity’ and ‘moral consumption’. These, I suggest, allow us to explore the relationships noted above, as well as allowing for a tracking of the contours of a state formation that is part of the informality it seeks to banish. The discussion also outlines some of the ways in which new forms of urban citizenship emerge through the changing relationships suggested above, as well those that are submerged.

START
Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0429 final poster
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Sat, April 2, 2016 from 11:30am - 01:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Between State and Faith: Aspects of Personal Laws in Colonial India

Student Event

Tanika Sarkar, Professor of Modern History, Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University

Chair: Hardeep Dhillon, PhD candidate in History, Harvard University

Cosponsored with The Center for South Asian and Indian Ocean Studies at Tufts University

START
Sat, Apr 2, 2016 at 11:30am

END
Sat, Apr 2, 2016 at 01:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0402_Sarkar FINAL 2
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Tue, March 29, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Water and Sacred Spaces: A Case Study of the Ellora-Khuldabad- Daulatabad Region

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Dr. Yaaminey MubayiCulture and Community Development

Chair: Jinah Kim, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Water as an essential resource for the evolution of human settlements throughout history, has thus far escaped the attention of scholars of history in South Asia. Contemporary research relating to the subject largely involves the examination of policy frameworks governing access to and distribution of water resources on the one hand, as well as fixating on the colonial period as a “watershed” dividing pre-modern water management systems from colonial and post-colonial policies seeking to control the use of water by communities. Both perspectives view the actual element, its presence in nature and forms of access by human agency, in an instrumental manner, reducing it to “fit in” as it were, into pre-determined political and disciplinary frameworks and arguments.

This seminar will offer a different perspective to the study of water and human history. It will focus on a historically settled and culturally active region of South Asia, i.e. Ellora-Khuldabad-Daulatabad in the Marathwada region of the Indian Deccan Plateau. It will seek to examine the ecological features of the region as underpinning the historical and cultural development of the political, socio-economic and cultural systems intrinsic to the area. Ellora-Khuldabad-Daulatabad, lying within a 10 km radius in Aurangabad district, are richly populated by historic sites such as the Ellora Cave complex, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Daulatabad Fort as also numerous smaller temples, pilgrimage centres, ashrams, Sufi dargahs and historic tanks (kunds). The theme for the region is set by the numerous water features, streams, rivulets, man-made reservoirs, temple tanks and historic state-sponsored waterworks. The micro-watershed of Khuldabad Taluka, within which the study area is located, provides an appropriate context for the evolution of human settlements in the region since pre-historic times.

START
Tue, Mar 29, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Mar 29, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0329 Water UPDATE
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Wed, March 9, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Caste in the time of globalization

Urbanization Seminar

Narendar Pani, Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India

Chair: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

The challenge of combating caste discrimination in India has generated two quite different approaches. There has been a radical view that the caste system can be made to disappear through, to use Ambedkar’s terminology, its annihilation. In contrast, there were approaches such as that of Gandhi as well as the first attempts at affirmative action in the princely state of Mysore in 1921, which allowed for the possible resilience of the institution and hence focused on ensuring greater equality between castes. This talk will begin by arguing that political reality has lent its weight, for better or for worse, to the idea of the resilience of caste. If we look at three important dimensions of caste – identity, power and discrimination – there is evidence of change but not necessarily a decline in importance. It will then explore the nature of this resilience in the face of global influences, using evidence from one of the Indian cities most impacted by globalization, Bangalore.

START
Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0309 Pani final
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Mon, February 29, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Jousting Over Jurisdiction: Sovereignty and International Law in Late Nineteeth-Century South Asia

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Priyasha Saksena, SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School; SAI Graduate Student Associate

Chair: Samuel Moyn, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

This talk focuses on jurisdictional disputes between the Indian princely states and the British Government in late nineteenth-century South Asia to flesh out both the role played by international law in the definition and contestation of the relationship between the princely states and the British Government, as well as the influence of such disputes on the development of international law ideas. In particular, the talk will examine the influence of the historical school of jurisprudence on the development of the idea of sovereignty. Focusing on jurisdictional disputes will enable us to understand that the rhetoric of inclusion-exclusion, along with the idea of legal evolution, was core to late nineteenth century international law.

START
Mon, Feb 29, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Feb 29, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0229_Priyasha jpg
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Wed, February 3, 2016 from 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Rohith Vemula, Death of a Dalit Scholar in Hyderabad

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Abha Sur, Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, MIT

Banu Subramaniam, Professor,  Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, UMass Amherst 

Suraj YengdeAssociate, Dept of African and African American Studies, Harvard University 

Chair: Ajantha SubramanianProfessor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies at Harvard University.

Rohith Chakravarti Vemula was an Indian PhD student at the Hyderabad Central University. His suicide on 17 January 2016 sparked protests and outrage from across India and gained widespread media attention as an alleged case of discrimination against Dalits and backward classes in India.

Join us for a discussion on the issues surrounding Rohith Vemula’s death and express solidarity with student and faculty protesters at Hyderabad University.

Join the Facebook event.

START
Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 4:00 pm

END
Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 5:30 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0213 Dalit Scholar
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Tue, January 26, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Summer Grant Opportunities Open House

Come hear about SAI Summer Funding opportunities, including research and internship grants, and ask any last minute questions about the application process.

Deadline to apply: February 17, 2016

Join the Facebook event.

START
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

open housr
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