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 Venue Information



CGIS South, S250
Harvard University


1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA





Events at this Venue


Fri, September 22, 2017 at 12:15pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Book Talk: India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971

A book talk on India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971
Dr. Arjun Subramaniam, Asia Center Fellow; former Faculty Member, National Defence College, New Delhi; retired Air Vice Marshal, Indian Air Force

Chair/Discussant: Professor Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

An Asia Center Fellows Seminar; co-sponsored by the South Asia Institute, Harvard University

START
Fri, Sep 22, 2017 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Sep 22, 2017

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Fellows Series India's Wars
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Thu, March 30, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Old Stories in New Moments: Digambara Jain Rāmāyaṇa Literature in Early Modernity

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Gregory Clines, Ph.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Catherine HartmannPh.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion

The fifteenth-century author Brahma Jinadāsa, a member of the Digambara Balatkāra Gaṇa, is credited with composing over eighty works in both Sanskrit and Old Gujarati. One of those compositions was the Padmapurāṇa, a Jain version of the story of Rāma composed in Sanskrit. In the introduction to the work, Jinadāsa acknowledges that his Padmapurāṇa is based off of the acclaimed poet Raviṣeṇa’s seventh-century work of the same name. This talk examines the relationship between the two works, analyzing the literary changes that Jinadāsa makes to his precursor’s text and the social implications of those changes.

 

START
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0330 Clines_
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Thu, March 23, 2017 from 04:15pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

POSTPONED: Film Screening: For Fun

This event has been postponed and will be rescheduled for the fall semester.

Cosponsored Event

A charming story of a group of senior citizens who set up a Peking Opera club in hopes of finding revitalization through singing and dancing. Fast paced and delightful.

Cosponsored with the Asia Center

START
Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 04:15pm

END
Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

For Fun
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Mon, March 20, 2017 from 04:15pm - 07:15pm  /  CGIS South, S250

POSTPONED: Film Screening: Baghban

This event has been postponed and will be rescheduled for the fall semester.

Cosponsored Event

An elderly couple wish their children to care for them in their old age. But their children see and treat them as a burden, and they must struggle to regain their worth and dignity to themselves and others.

Cosponsored with Asia Center

START
Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 04:15pm

END
Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 07:15pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Baghban
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Mon, March 6, 2017 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Dastangoi: The art of Urdu storytelling

*Please not the change in start time.

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Ankit Chadha, Storyteller / Author

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Dastangoi, the lost art of Urdu storytelling, developed in eighth century A.D. around the adventures of an Arab hero, Amir Hamza. These stories became very popular in the 19th century North India. With the demise of the last known exponent of the art form in 1928, Mir Baqar Ali, the form also died with him. The modern revival has seen not just the performance of the traditional stories from the Hamza dastan, but also the adaptations of more local and contemporary themes. Ankit Chadha, a writer and storyteller, has been a practitioner of Dastangoi since 2010. His writing varies from biographical accounts of personalities like Kabir, Rahim, Dara Shikoh and Majaaz to modern folk tales on corporate culture, internet and mobile technology. Ankit also has works for young audiences and has worked on Urdu adaptations of children’s classics; including Alice and The Little Prince. He is the author of the award-winning book for children, My Gandhi Story, and the recently released, Amir Khusrau – The Man in Riddles.

 

START
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0306 Chadha
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Thu, January 26, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Summer Grant Opportunities Open House

Come hear about SAI Summer Funding opportunities, including research and internship grants, and ask any last minute questions about the application process.

Deadline to apply: February 15, 2017

START
Thu, Jan 26, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Jan 26, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

012617 Open House
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Mon, November 14, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Pipe Politics: Mumbai’s Contested Waters 

Urbanization Seminar

Lisa BjorkmanAssistant Professor of Urban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

In the Indian city of Mumbai, two dazzling decades of urban development and roaring economic growth have presided over the steady deterioration – and sometimes spectacular breakdown – of the city’s water infrastructures. Water troubles plague not only the more-than 60% of city residents now reported to live in ‘slums,’ but city elites as well have seen their taps grow increasingly erratic and prone to drying up. The everyday risks of water shortage that infuse the city’s water infrastructures– risks that flow across class lines – are managed and mitigated through the forging and maintenance of elaborate knowledge-exchange networks. Getting water to come out of Mumbai’s pipes is an activity that requires continuous attention to and intimate knowledge of a complex and dynamic social and political hydraulic landscape. Ethnographic attention reveals how water is made to flow by means of intimate forms of knowledge and ongoing intervention in the city’s complex and dynamic social, political, and hydraulic landscape. The everyday work of getting water animates and inhabits a penumbra of infrastructural activity – of business, brokerage, secondary markets and socio-political networks – whose workings are transforming lives as well as reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city. Mumbai’s illegible and volatile hydrologies are lending infrastructures increasing political salience just as actual control over pipes and flows becomes contingent upon dispersed and intimate assemblages of knowledge, power, and material authority.

START
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Wednesday Draft
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