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Events at this Venue


Wed, October 5, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Puja and the Space between Devotee and God: An Anthropology of Atmosphere

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Frank Heidemann, Professor, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Chair: Richard Wolf, Professor of Music and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

In puja, a Hindu act of worship, the relationship between devotee and God is transformed and the space between them altered. Using case studies of the Badagas in the Nilgiri hills of South India, this presentation analyzes puja in light of the New Phenomenology and Gernot Böhme’s philosophy of atmosphere.

Atmosphere, according to Böhme, is the quality of a surrounding space, as perceived by all the senses and the felt body (Leib). It is an intersubjective, fluid, dynamic totality: a total social fact. The perceiving persons are co-producers and part of the atmosphere, but they consider it an external, “half thing” (Halbding). Atmospheres create social realities, contextual norms, and have an impact on the emotional state of individuals. Every society has specialists who strategically construct and monitor the process of creating atmospheres. Puja and other activities of priests produce particular religious atmospheres and contribute to a shared emotional state among devotees. In other contexts atmospheres contribute to what Heidemann calls “social proprioception.” He argue for an anthropology of atmosphere that investigates the production and perception of social atmospheres and their ontologies.

Cosponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies

START
Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

1005 Heidemann
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Fri, April 22, 2016 from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S153

East India Company Revisited

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Atul KohIi, David K.E. Bruce Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.

START
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 2:00 pm

END
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

4.22.16-Kohli
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Fri, February 19, 2016 at 12:15 pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Freedom and Fear in Myanmar

Modern Asia Seminar and Arts at SAI Seminar

Ian Holliday,Vice-President and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning), The University of Hong Kong

‘Altered State: Painting Myanmar in a time of transition,’ an exhibit of paintings will be on display Thursday, February 4 – Monday, February 22, 2016 in the Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA

Sponsored by the Asia Center and the South Asia Institute 

View the paintings here.

START
Fri, Feb 19, 2016 at 12:15 pm

END
Fri, Feb 19, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Freedom and Fear Myanmar poster
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Thu, December 3, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Aid and poverty: Are grants and loans different?

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Javed Younas, Aman Fellow, South Asia Institute

Chair: Asim Khwaja, Sumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School

The aid allocation literature reveals a negative association between the recipients’ income and aid inflows, implying that, all else equal, poorer nations receive more aid. This literature has assumed that two forms of aid flows – grants and concessional loans – are determined identically. Thus, its findings reflect average behavioral patterns based on an aggregate of these two distinct transfer types. This study unveils different incentive effects of grants and concessional loans. We show that the findings of the aid allocation literature apply to grants but not to concessional loans. In particular, the amount of grants decreases with income, whereas the amount of concessional loans increases with income. The analysis is also notable for using exogenous variations in remittances and temperature as instruments for income. Other econometric issues such as cross-sectional dependence and multiple endogenous variables are also taken into account. The implications of the findings for aid effectiveness debates will discussed. Further tests reveal a larger impact of concessional loans on investment.

START
Thu, Dec 3, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 3, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

aid& poverty
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Thu, November 5, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Beyond the Madrassa: Investigating the Civic Infrastructure of Islamist Groups in an Urban Setting

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Laila Bushra, Babar Ali Fellow, South Asia Institute

Chair: Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Over the last three decades, Islamic educational institutions (madrassas) operating in Pakistan have witnessed a dramatic expansion in their numbers and geographical scope. Being more than simply the breeding grounds for militant groups and ideologies, madrassas are internally diverse and dynamic institutions. Using the urban milieu of Lahore as the framework, Bushra uses the term ‘Islamist civic infrastructure’ to analyze the vast array of functions and activities that madrassas perform in collaboration with other entities, both religious and secular. These include educational institutions of several types, publications and publishing houses, student and professional organizations, religious merchandise, and regular meetings and rituals. This infrastructure has a well-defined internal hierarchy, and has penetrated evermore arenas of social activity over time. The ideological and cultural reach of this civic Islamic component is arguably even more influential and resilient than the militant component usually associated with ‘jihad’.

Click here to read a summary of the event.

START
Thu, Nov 5, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Nov 5, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

1106 madrassa
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Mon, November 2, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

cityinflux

Arts Seminar

Ranjit Kandalgaonkar, Visiting Artist, SAI Arts Program

Chair: Chitra Venkataramani, South Asian Studies Fellow, South Asia Institute

Kandalgaonkar’s art practice focuses primarily on unseen or ignored processes of urbanization. In his work, he draws upon contemporary visual arts media, archival documentation and historical artifacts to document, represent and critique urban flows. cityinflux is the name of his practice and an ode to the city’s urban condition that he is continuously invested in unlocking.

About Ranjit Kandalgaonkar’s work:

Since 2009, Stories of Philanthropic Trusts is a research project documenting all the communities living in 19th century Bombay and recording their philanthropic activities. Prior to that, Kandalgaonkar had collaborated with two architects on a project named Gentricity. It is a composite project covering urban planning, public culture, and visual art. The project has developed some multi-disciplinary paintings of localities in Mumbai, which represent narratives of the sites examined (old tenements and mixed-housing scenarios). build/browse looked at markets across London and Mumbai and aims to install an ongoing alternate archive of oral histories of objects found in markets. The online platform allows the public to engage in this project in the form of an interactive building game made with the help of web-coders. 7 isles unclaimed is a speculative/science fiction work imagining the original 7 island archipelago of Mumbai as never having become the reclaimed land form it is today. The stories, drawings and fictive maps re-imagine points in history where the city narrative could have gone either way.

The Arts at SAI initiative connects South Asia’s curators, museum administrators, artists, and art educators with Harvard faculty and students to support activity and research that advance understanding and appreciation of the tapestry of South Asian art and the heritage that defines its voice in the world.

START
Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

102815_Ranjit NEW
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Fri, October 2, 2015 at 12:15pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Challenges to Pakistan’s Tortuous Path to Democracy and Good Governance

Cosponsored Event

Ajmal Qureshi, Senior Fellow, Harvard University Asia Center

Discussant: Laila BushraBabar Ali Fellow, South Asia Institute

Cosponsored with the Modern Asia and Fellows Seminar Series, Asia Center

START
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 12:15pm

END
Fri, Oct 2, 2015

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

1006 Pakistan Asia Center
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Thu, April 2, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Empire from the Edges: Shi‘i and Messianic Challenges to Mughal Authority

Updated location: CGIS South S153

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Samira Sheikh, Associate Professor of History; Associate Professor of Asian Studies Program; Affiliated Faculty, Islamic Studies Program; Co-Director Vanderbilt History Seminar, Vanderbilt University.

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Shi`i and messianic groups in Gujarat evolved an often uncomfortable coexistence with Mughal political authority, one that was eased by occasionally imperial diktat but was regularly punctuated by bouts of violence and repression. This seminar will examine Mughal relations with three such groups from the late sixteenth century to the early eighteenth, paying attention to local politics and raising the question of whether Akbar’s supposed “tolerance” and Aurangzeb’s assumed “bigotry” are useful frames for discussion of empire, religion, and region.

Co-sponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program

START
Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

0402 Poster - Copy
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