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Events at this Venue


Wed, February 22, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Religion, Ethics, and Nascent Nationalism and the Partition

Partition Seminar

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Given that Partition is widely considered to have resulted due to religious differences, it is critical to explore the interplay between religion and nationalism in pre-Partition rhetoric, in the post-Partition riots, and in the actual migration process. It is interesting, also, to explore, the historical root of the idea of a separate Muslim homeland, as well as histories of multi-faith society in India.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar. | Facebook Event

START
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0215 Asani
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Wed, February 15, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Gender and the Partition

Partition Seminar

Catherine WarnerCollege Fellow in South Asian Studies and History, Harvard University

When Partition is viewed from the lens of gender history, what happens? Is this the same history with women’s voices added and silences interpreted, or does it offer alternate scales and geographies? To what extent did Partition shape the gendering of citizenship in South Asia? This seminar will examine how narratives of gendered violence have been collected, read, and interpreted in Partition historiography. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to survey the state of the field and consider possibilities for future research on citizenship, gender, coercion and mobility in post-colonial South Asia.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30. All are welcome.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event

START
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0215 Warner
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Wed, February 15, 2017 from 07:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

Special Event

About the group discussion:

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Feb. 15. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Discussion Group_Partition
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Wed, February 8, 2017 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Historical and Humanitarian Consequences of Migration

The seminar will take place in CGIS S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA.

Partition Seminar

Jennifer Leaning, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

The seminar will explore the story of the mass migration of Hindus/Sikhs and Muslims from Pakistan and India respectively into the other country and the resulting humanitarian crisis. Professor Leaning will analyze: the Boundary Commission’s work, the patterns of migration, and unprecedented sectarian violence, including massacres, physical violence, and destruction of property. Leaning will also consider ethics and mechanics of care provided as part of immediate relief. Special attention will be focused on the role played by the main players during and after Partition, including the key political parties and individuals. Erum Sattar, SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School, will provide insights into how water issues relate to Partition.

Light refreshments will be served.

From 5 to 5:30, we will be hosting a group discussion about the SAI initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of Partition in crowd proportions. The goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. All are welcome to attend the discussion.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event

#SAIPartition

START
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0208 JL poster
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Wed, February 1, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

History and Context of the Partition

Partition Seminar

Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of History, Harvard University

Professor Amrith will give a broad overview of South Asian political history, including a history of British colonial rule in South Asia, the place of South Asia within the empire, and specifically governance policies and systemic factors that contributed to the Partition. The seminar will cover seminal events such as the 1857 Rebellion, development of canal colonies in Punjab, and the 1905 Partition of Bengal. The seminar will contribute to understanding the independence movement and politics both internal and external (World War II, Quit India Movement, 1946 Riots) that culminated in the independence and creation of India and a bifurcated Pakistan.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30 about the project. All are welcome.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0201 Sunil
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Wed, February 1, 2017 from 07:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

Special Event

About the group discussion:

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Feb. 1. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 1, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Discussion Group_Partition
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Mon, November 7, 2016 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Research Methods Talk: Using Corpus Analysis to Study Media Discourse: Comparing Discussions of Islamic Marriage Reform in India and Pakistan

Cosponsored Event

Sharon Tai, Research Editor, SHARIAsource

Ali Hashmi, MIT Media Lab Research Affiliate (2015-2016) and SHARIAsource Editor/Data Scientist

Osama Siddique, Henry J. Steiner Visiting Professor in Human Rights, Harvard Law School, Law and Policy Research Network

This talk focuses on using corpus analysis as a research method. Media discourse on legislative issues provides a rich source for deriving research questions. This talk asks for feedback on the development of a new corpus analysis tool that is being used to analyze and compare how contemporary media in India and Pakistan is shaping discourse about issues of marriage reform and Islamic law. The tool uses source corpora from Media Cloud, which is a collaborative project between the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Osama Siddique, Harvard Law School, will be a respondent to the panel by giving feedback on how the tool could be used, improved, and further developed from his experience as a scholar, lawyer, and social scientist.

Cosponsored with ILSP: SHARIAsource at Harvard Law School

Light refreshments will be provided

*Please note the change in location.

START
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 7, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1107 ILSP SeminarUPDATE
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Mon, October 17, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Urbanization in South Asia: Conversations from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh

Urbanization Seminar

Dr. A Ravindra, Chairman, Institute for Social & Economic Change, Bangalore

Adnan Morshed, Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning, the Catholic University of America 

Mubbashir RizviAssistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Georgetown University

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

This panel brings together three urban scholars and practitioners from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and it deals with the contemporary challenges facing rapid urbanization in South Asia. This panel presents a unique opportunity to have a cross-cutting conversation across South Asian countries to both situate their planning experiences in their specific contexts, but to also ask if there are any commonalities about the South Asian urban experience. It is also a chance to learn about design and planning practices from across neighboring boundaries.

 

START
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1006 Urbanization
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Thu, March 31, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

How $100 Smartphones are Transforming the Government in Pakistan

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Umar Saif, Chairman, Punjab Information Technology Board (PITB); Vice Chancellor, ITU

Chair: Karim R. Lakhani, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Pakistan is the 6th largest country in the world by population. Over half of the population lives below $2 poverty line; 40% of the adult population is unable to read or write; 30% lack access to clean drinking water; 85% of the world’s polio cases are from Pakistan. At the same time, with over 137 Million cellphone users in Pakistan, almost every household has a cellphone; Pakistani’s sent over 320 Billion SMS last year; you can buy a smartphone for less than $50 in Pakistan.

In this talk, Saif will present a number of smartphone-based systems his team has developed to monitor government work, improve civic services and collect citizen feedback in Pakistan. This talk will explain how they used smartphones to track and contain a Dengue epidemic, identify crime hotspots, measure teacher presence and monitor visits of rural doctors. Saif will specifically talk about an innovative vaccinator tracking application that has totally transformed the vaccination program in Pakistan to eradicate Polio.

Prof. Umar Saif works as the Chairman of the Punjab Information Technology Board (PITB), heading all public-sector IT projects in Punjab. He is also the founding Vice Chancellor of ITU, a newly setup research university in Lahore. Prof. Saif received his PhD in 2001 at University of Cambridge and worked at MIT for several years before returning to Pakistan. He was named as one of the top 35 young innovators by the MIT Technology Review (TR35) in 2011 and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2010. He received a Google Faculty Research award in 2011. In 2014, Prof. Saif was awarded Sitara-i-Imtiaz, one of the highest civil awards by government of Pakistan. He was named among the 500 most influential Muslims in the world in 2015 and 2016.

Cosponsored with the Harvard Pakistan Student Group

START
Thu, Mar 31, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 31, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0331 Saif
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