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 Venue Information



CGIS South, S050
Harvard University


1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA





Events at this Venue


Thu, September 28, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Winter Session 2018: Finding and Funding International Opportunities for Undergraduates

Join Harvard area studies centers and the Office of Career Services at an information session about Wintersession opportunities during the January break for Harvard undergraduates.

Questions? Please email: ocs_summerfunding@fas.harvard.edu

https://cmes.fas.harvard.edu/event/wintersession-2018-info

START
Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 05:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

wintersession
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Wed, April 5, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Coins as Historical Puzzles: Examples from Ancient India

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Pankaj Tandon, Associate Professor of Economics, Boston University

Chair: Sunil AmrithMehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

Coins are small metallic documents of the past. In the images and legends impressed upon them, they contain clues that can give us insights into the times in which they were created and used. In this talk, examples from ancient India will be used to show how the unpuzzling of these clues can help us bring back forgotten dynasties, recreate historical events and shine a light on political and economic conditions.

START
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0405 coins
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Mon, March 27, 2017 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Conversation on the Intersection of Culture, Journalism and Religion

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Madeeha Syed, Pakistani Journalist

Marco Werman, The World

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Join Pakistani journalist Madeeha Syed, Marco Werman from Public Radio International’s The World, and Ali S. Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures at Harvard University, for a conversation about the intersection of culture, journalism and religion in today’s global environment.

The conversation is cosponsored by the Center Stage program of New England Foundation For The Arts and SAI

Reception to follow.

START
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0327 Syed Werman
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Wed, March 22, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Witness to Two Partitions: 1947 and 1971

Partition Seminar

Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, Affiliated Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and International Coordinator of the global research-policy-action network Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO)

Chen will be speaking from a personal perspective, as a long-term resident of India and Pakistan who witnessed two partitions: 1947 and 1971. For the 1947 Partition of India, Chen plans to feature excerpts from her grandmother’s letters written that year from Rawalpindi to family in the USA, and also her own few memories of that time as a 3-year-old. For the 1971 Partition of Pakistan, Chen will recall a series of events she witnessed:  the cyclone and tidal wave of November 1970, the elections of December 1970, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman’s historic speech in March 1971, the military crackdown that led to civil war later that month, and Sheikh Mujib’s release from Pakistani custody and return to Dhaka in January 1972.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0322 Chen
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Wed, March 8, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Radcliffe Boundary Commission: Cartography and Conflict in the Partition of India and Pakistan

Partition Seminar

Lucy ChesterAssociate Professor, University of Colorado Boulder

Over a period of six weeks in the summer of 1947, Cyril Radcliffe, a British lawyer who had never been to India and had no experience in boundary-making, drew a 2500-mile-long line that would divide India and Pakistan. This talk will examine the pseudo-judicial framework and deeply politicized nature of the Radcliffe Boundary Commission’s work. I aim to clarify the geographical thinking of the main political parties involved in this commission, the reasoning behind Radcliffe’s deliberations, and the boundary’s role in partition violence.

The role of maps, as texts that communicate contemporary attitudes and beliefs, will receive particular attention. Many of the maps used in this division had been created as tools of colonial control. The “silences” of such maps, such as the absence of information about the inhabitants of the territory depicted, significantly impacted the Radcliffe Commission’s work. Other maps were the product of nationalist attempts to shape independent South Asia. They had silences of their own, with costs and benefits that continue to influence what is arguably a still unfolding partition.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar. | Facebook Event

START
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0308 Chester
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Wed, March 1, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition / Crowd Sourcing Memories

Partition Seminar

5:00 – 6:00 PM: The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition

Prashant Bharadwaj, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego

This paper examines how areas affected by the partition fare in the long run. Using migrant presence as a proxy for the intensity of the impact of the partition, and district level data on agricultural output between 1911-2009, we find that areas that received more migrants have higher average yields, are more likely to take up high yielding varieties (HYV) of seeds, and are more likely to use agricultural technologies. These correlations are more pronounced after the Green Revolution in India. Using pre-partition data, we show that migrant placement is uncorrelated with soil conditions, agricultural infrastructure, and agricultural yields prior to 1947; hence, the effects are not solely explained by selective migration into districts with a higher potential for agricultural development. Migrants moving to India were more educated than both the natives who stayed and the migrants who moved out. Given the positive association of education with the adoption of high yielding varieties of seeds we highlight the presence of educated migrants during the timing of the Green Revolution as a potential pathway for the observed effects.

6:00 – 7:00 PM: Crowd Sourcing Memories of Partition

Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

This part of the project is focusing on oral accounts of the Partition. They are attempting to build a comprehensive database of oral histories through crowd-sourcing, and the use of modern techniques to collect, analyze, and store information from an individual’s experience. The aim is to preserve the rightful spot of these stories in history and give a voice to the realities experienced in the data and surrounding research. The project will enrich the descriptive picture of the event and extend the implications of these stories to understand consequences today.

Light refreshments will be served.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30 about the project. All are welcome.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Facebook EventAdd to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0301 Prashant Karim
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Wed, March 1, 2017 from 07:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Mar. 1. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0126 Partition Seminars_
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