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SAI Event Type : Book Talk


Thu, April 20, 2017 from 07:00pm - 09:00pm  /  The Harvard Advocate

An Evening with Rana Dasgupta

Cosponsored Event

A public reading and discussion with British-Indian author Rana Dasgupta. Rana is a novelist and essayist, and the winner of the 2010 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for his novel Solo. He currently lives in Delhi and his nonfiction book Capital constructs an intimate oral history to unfold the possibilities and catastrophes of the city’s elite class. Rana is in the United States to lecture this month at Brown University.

No RSVP required. Refreshments will be served.

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/420864254936925/

Sponsored by the Harvard Advocate and the Harvard South Asia Institute

START
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 20, 2017 at 09:00pm

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Mon, November 16, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  WCC 2009

Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia

Book Talk

Mark TushnetWilliam Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Rohit De, Associate Research Scholar in Law, Yale

Nick Robinson, Resident Fellow, Center on the Legal Profession

Cosponsored with Harvard Law School

Although the field of constitutional law has become increasingly comparative in recent years, its geographic focus has remained limited. South Asia, despite being the site of the world’s largest democracy and a vibrant if turbulent constitutionalism, is one of the important neglected regions within the field. This book remedies this lack of attention by providing a detailed examination of constitutional law and practice in five South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Identifying a common theme of volatile change, it develops the concept of “unstable constitutionalism,” studying the sources of instability alongside reactions and responses to it. By highlighting unique theoretical and practical questions in an underrepresented region, Unstable Constitutionalism constitutes an important step toward truly global constitutional scholarship.

START
Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Nov 16, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
WCC 2009, Harvard Law School

ADDRESS
WCC 2009, Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA

1116 Constitution
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Tue, November 10, 2015

CANCELLED: To the Brink and Back: India’s 1991 Story

This event has been cancelled and will be rescheduled. 

Book Talk

Jairam Ramesh, Member of Parliament; Former Minister of Environment and Rural Development

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

To The Brink and Back is an account of the events leading to the path-breaking economic liberalisation unveiled by Rao’s government with Manmohan Singh as the Union finance minister.

Cosponsored with the India & South Asia Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

START
Tue, Nov 10, 2015

END
Tue, Nov 10, 2015

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Mon, May 4, 2015 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Building a new Nepal – After the Quake

SAI Special Event

Prashant Jha, Associate Editor, Hindustan Times.

Chair: Madhav Khosla, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Theory, Department of Government, Harvard University

On April 25, Nepal was hit by a devastating earthquake. Almost 5000 people have died and the numbers are steadily increasing. The full scale of losses in terms of human casualties, homes destroyed and cultural heritage reduced to rubble is still not known. The earthquake has tested the already limited resolve of the Nepali state, which is struggling to cope and respond to the disaster – especially in rural areas. In this backdrop, what is the current situation on the ground and challenges ahead for the government? How did Nepal get here and could a functional political order have equipped the country to deal with this better? What will be the possible political implications of this disaster – in terms of the quest for a new constitution? What has been the role of India in relief efforts – and in general in Nepal? Where does the rest of the international community come in? The talk will focus on these and related issues.

 Note: This event was originally scheduled to be titled ‘Remaking a nation: Nepal’s tryst with peace, constitutionalism and sovereignty.’

Learn more about Harvard For Nepal.

 

START
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0504 Nepal Seminar   - Copy
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Fri, March 27, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

The Prisoner

SAI Book Talk

Omar Shahid Hamid, Author

Chair: Anila Daulatzai, Visiting Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and Islamic Studies, Harvard Divinity School

Omar Shahid Hamid has served with the Karachi police for twelve years, most recently as head of counterterrorism. During his service, he has been actively targeted by various terrorist groups and organizations. He was wounded in the line of duty and his office was bombed by the Taliban in 2010. He left Karachi for a sabbatical when there were too many contracts on his life. He has a master’s in criminal justice policy from the London School of Economics and a master’s in law from University College London.

Much like the protagonist in his police procedural, The Prisoner, Hamid was forced to navigate the byzantine politics, shifting alliances, and backroom dealings of Karachi police and intelligence agencies. In his novel, Hamid exposes that dark side of Karachi, as only a police officer could. His writing has garnered praise for rejecting a romanticized take on slum life—as is characteristic in Pakistani English literature—in favor of gritty realism.

A thinly veiled fictional interpretation of real-life events, the novel follows Constantine D’Souza, a Christian police officer charged with rescuing kidnapped American journalist Jon Friedland (a.k.a., 2002 captured Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl). With no leads, D’Souza recruits Akbar Khan, a rogue cop imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit (modeled on Pakistan’s famed take-no-prisoners officer Chaudhry Aslam Khan). Caught between Pakistan’s militant ruling party and the Pakistani intelligence agencies, D’Souza finds himself in a race against time to save a man’s life—and the honor of his nation.

Book sale to follow.

START
Fri, Mar 27, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 27, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Prisoner 9781628725247
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Tue, February 17, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries

SAI Book Talk

Sanchita Saxena, Director of the Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Berkeley; Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

Fauzia Ahmed, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies, Miami University; SAI Research Affiliate

Chair: John A. Quelch, Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School; Professor in Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health

By analyzing the garment sector through the lens of domestic coalitions, Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries presents new and innovative ways of conceptualizing the garment and textiles industries that include the possibility for change and resistance from a vantage point of cooperation among key groups, rather than only contention. The book utilizes the established policy networks framework, which has traditionally only been applied to the United States and European nations, but expertly adapts it to countries in the global South. Saxena’s domestic coalitions approach, which can be thought of as a precursor to a full policy network, differs from the policy network approach in crucial ways by highlighting the importance of other actors or facilitators in the network, recognizing that interactions among stakeholders are just as important as interactions between groups and the state, as well as the incentives associated with expanding the existing coalition.

Book sale to follow.

START
Tue, Feb 17, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 17, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0217 Bangladesh Book Talk Poster (1)
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Tue, November 4, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Seasons of Trouble: Life Amid the Ruins of Sri Lanka’s Civil War

SAI Book Talk

Rohini Mohan, Author

V.V. (Sugi) Ganeshananthan, Bunting Fellow, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University; Author of Love Marriage 

Chair: Charles Hallisey, Yehan Numata Senior Lecturer on Buddhist Literatures, Harvard Divinity School

Book sale to follow event.

For three decades, Sri Lanka’s civil war tore communities apart. In 2009, the Sri Lankan army finally defeated the separatist Tamil Tigers guerrillas in a fierce battle that swept up about 300,000 civilians and killed more than 40,000. More than a million had been displaced by the conflict, and the resilient among them still dared to hope. But the next five years changed everything.

Rohini Mohan’s searing account of three lives caught up in the devastation looks beyond the heroism of wartime survival to reveal the creeping violence of the everyday. When city-bred Sarva is dragged off the streets by state forces, his middle-aged mother, Indra, searches for him through the labyrinthine Sri Lankan bureaucracy. Meanwhile, Mugil, a former child soldier, deserts the Tigers in the thick of war to protect her family.

Having survived, they struggle to live as the Sri Lankan state continues to attack minority Tamils and Muslims, frittering away the era of peace. Sarva flees the country, losing his way – and almost his life – in a bid for asylum. Mugil stays, breaking out of the refugee camp to rebuild her family and an ordinary life in the village she left as a girl. But in her tumultuous world, desires, plans, and people can be snatched away in a moment.

The Seasons of Trouble is a startling, brutal, yet beau­tifully written debut from a prize-winning journal­ist. It is a classic piece of reportage, five years in the making, and a trenchant, compassionate examina­tion of the corrosive effect of conflict on a people.

Read: Life Amid the Ruins of Sri Lanka’s Civil War

START
Tue, Nov 4, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Nov 4, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Mohan Poster
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Tue, October 7, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Awakening of Muslim Democracy: Religion, Modernity, and the State

SAI Book Talk

Jocelyne Cesari, Senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, Visiting Associate professor in the Department of Government, Georgetown University; Director of Islam in the West, Harvard University

Chair: Asad Ahmed, Assistant Professor, Social Anthropology Program, Harvard University

In this book, Jocelyne Cesari explores the relationship between modernization, politics, and Islam in Muslim-majority countries. She contends that nation-building in these environments has produced national ideologies rooted in the politicization of Islam, rather than liberal democracies following the Western model. Cesari’s historical examination covers the post-WWII period to the Arab Spring and informs the book’s consideration of the role of Islam in contemporary Middle Eastern emerging democracies.

Scholar Discusses Democracy in Islamic States (The Harvard Crimson)

START
Tue, Oct 7, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Oct 7, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1007 Poster Cesari (1)
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Thu, October 2, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  Perkins Room, Rubenstein 415, HKS

China, India, and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan

SAI Book Talk

Luke Patey, Senior Researcher at the Dan­ish Insti­tute for Inter­na­tional Studies

Discussants:

Rohit ChandraPhD candidate, Harvard Kennedy School

Ahmad Al-MahiMPA candidate, Harvard Kennedy School

Note: Due to heightened security because of visiting dignitaries, please enter the Rubinstein building from the JFK park entrance on October 2. Non-Harvard attendees should contact Rohit Chandra (rchandra@fas.harvard.edu) ASAP otherwise they may be unable to enter the building.

For over a decade, Sudan fuelled the rise of China and India’s national oil companies. But the political turmoil surrounding the historic division of Africa’s largest country, with the birth of South Sudan, challenged Asia’s oil giants to chart a new course. The outbreak of conflict in South Sudan last December only deepened the instability and insecurity and sent Chinese and Indian diplomats scrambling to reinvigorate their foreign policies to protect their interests and bring an end to the conflict.

The lecture will discuss the overseas investments of Chinese and Indian national oil companies, their close ties with their respective governments in Beijing and New Delhi, and experiences with political and security risks in Sudan and South Sudan. It draws from Luke Patey’s recent book The New Kings of Crude: China, India, and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan. Beyond examining the economic and political impact of Chinese and Indian engagement in Sudan and South Sudan, the book argues that the two Sudans are examples of how Africa is shaping the rise of China and India as world powers.

Luke Patey is a senior researcher at the Dan­ish Insti­tute for Inter­na­tional Studies. His work focuses on the polit­i­cal econ­omy of oil in Sudan and South Sudan, the role of China and India in Africa, and the global invest­ments of Chi­nese and Indian national oil companies. He has written for the Finan­cial Times, The Guardian, The Hindu, and VICE News. He has been a Vis­it­ing Scholar at Peking Uni­ver­sity (Bei­jing), the Social Sci­ence Research Coun­cil (New York), and the Cen­tre d’études et de recherches inter­na­tionales (Paris).

START
Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
Perkins Room, Rubenstein Building, Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

China India Oil 10214
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