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SAI Event Topic : Urbanization


Mon, November 14, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Pipe Politics: Mumbai’s Contested Waters 

Urbanization Seminar

Lisa BjorkmanAssistant Professor of Urban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

In the Indian city of Mumbai, two dazzling decades of urban development and roaring economic growth have presided over the steady deterioration – and sometimes spectacular breakdown – of the city’s water infrastructures. Water troubles plague not only the more-than 60% of city residents now reported to live in ‘slums,’ but city elites as well have seen their taps grow increasingly erratic and prone to drying up. The everyday risks of water shortage that infuse the city’s water infrastructures– risks that flow across class lines – are managed and mitigated through the forging and maintenance of elaborate knowledge-exchange networks. Getting water to come out of Mumbai’s pipes is an activity that requires continuous attention to and intimate knowledge of a complex and dynamic social and political hydraulic landscape. Ethnographic attention reveals how water is made to flow by means of intimate forms of knowledge and ongoing intervention in the city’s complex and dynamic social, political, and hydraulic landscape. The everyday work of getting water animates and inhabits a penumbra of infrastructural activity – of business, brokerage, secondary markets and socio-political networks – whose workings are transforming lives as well as reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city. Mumbai’s illegible and volatile hydrologies are lending infrastructures increasing political salience just as actual control over pipes and flows becomes contingent upon dispersed and intimate assemblages of knowledge, power, and material authority.

START
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Wednesday Draft
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Mon, October 17, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Urbanization in South Asia: Conversations from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh

Urbanization Seminar

Dr. A Ravindra, Chairman, Institute for Social & Economic Change, Bangalore

Adnan Morshed, Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning, the Catholic University of America 

Mubbashir RizviAssistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Georgetown University

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

This panel brings together three urban scholars and practitioners from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and it deals with the contemporary challenges facing rapid urbanization in South Asia. This panel presents a unique opportunity to have a cross-cutting conversation across South Asian countries to both situate their planning experiences in their specific contexts, but to also ask if there are any commonalities about the South Asian urban experience. It is also a chance to learn about design and planning practices from across neighboring boundaries.

 

START
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1006 Urbanization
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Tue, April 5, 2016 from 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Techno-networks and Urban Space in Bombay Cinema

Urbanization Seminar

Ranjani Mazumdar, Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

This paper looks at the role of media and communication technologies in the imagination of urban spaces in contemporary Bombay cinema. If surveillance practices and their resultant structuring becomes one part of this imagination (No Smoking 2007, LSD 2010, Ugly, 2013), we also see the role of the internet and social media in the framing of spatial encounters in small town India (Masaan 2015). A fascination for ‘obsolete’ technology frames another order of space linked to the recent past (Gangs of Wasseypur 2012, Miss Lovely 2012, Dum Lagake Haisha, 2015), while documentary films like John and Jayne (2005) invoke the call centre imagination within a fractured urban subjectivity. In these films, the themes of violence, love, tragedy and comedy are enacted within a spatial terrain triggered by new media technologies. Taken together these films offer a new geography of the experiential changes unraveling in contemporary India.

Ranjani Mazumdar is Professor of Cinema Studies at the School of Arts & Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Her publications focus on urban cultures, popular cinema, gender and the cinematic city. She is the author of Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City (2007) and co-author with Nitin Govil of the forthcoming The Indian Film Industry. She has also worked as a documentary filmmaker and her productions include Delhi Diary 2001 and The Power of the Image (Co-Directed). Her current research focuses on globalization and film culture, the visual culture of film posters and the intersection of technology, travel, design and colour in 1960s Bombay Cinema.

START
Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 6:30 pm

END
Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 8:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0405 mazumdar final_
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Mon, March 28, 2016 from 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S354

India: the Urban Transition

Urbanization Seminar 

Henrik Valeur, Architect-Urbanist, Founder and Creative Director of UiD

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Can India use urbanization as a driver of economic, human and social development like China has done? How can Indian cities be made more inclusive, productive and livable? Are there any simple solutions to the seemingly insurmountable problems of urban India – the life threatening levels of air pollution, the desperate lack of water, the precarious food situation, the squalid living conditions in the slums, the chaotic, choked and congested road traffic? This lecture will discuss some of these problems and propose some possible solutions, using the cities of Bangalore in South India and Chandigarh in North India as its primary cases. The concept of smart cities will briefly be discussed and co-evolution and development urbanism will be introduced as alternative strategies.

START
Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 6:30 pm

END
Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 8:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0328 valeur FINAL
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Wed, March 9, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Caste in the time of globalization

Urbanization Seminar

Narendar Pani, Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India

Chair: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

The challenge of combating caste discrimination in India has generated two quite different approaches. There has been a radical view that the caste system can be made to disappear through, to use Ambedkar’s terminology, its annihilation. In contrast, there were approaches such as that of Gandhi as well as the first attempts at affirmative action in the princely state of Mysore in 1921, which allowed for the possible resilience of the institution and hence focused on ensuring greater equality between castes. This talk will begin by arguing that political reality has lent its weight, for better or for worse, to the idea of the resilience of caste. If we look at three important dimensions of caste – identity, power and discrimination – there is evidence of change but not necessarily a decline in importance. It will then explore the nature of this resilience in the face of global influences, using evidence from one of the Indian cities most impacted by globalization, Bangalore.

START
Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0309 Pani final
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Mon, February 22, 2016 at 06:30pm to
Tue, February 23, 2016 at 02:30pm  /  CGIS South, S010

Re-thinking Local: A Cross-regional Dialogue about Strategies for Local Practice in Cities

Student Event

“Re-thinking Local” will examine how architects are developing new models of locally-based design practice given the changing realities of urbanization around the world, with a particular focus on South and Southeast Asia.

These two public events feature Vo Trong Nghia, the most prolific contemporary architect in Vietnam, and Marina Tabassum, the leading female architect in Bangladesh – both speaking at Harvard for the first time.

In addition, Nghia and Tabassum will be joined in a round-table discussion by Michael Murphy, Executive Director of MASS Design Group, and Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning at Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

This public discussion program will thematically explore how architects are responding to new patterns of urbanization, creating models for construction and fabrication that support sustainable development, and catalyzing local institutions to promote dialogue about the role of design in improving cities. Together, the work of these architects gives new meaning to the model of practicing locally.

Click here for participant bios.

Roundtable discussion with Vo Trong Nghia, Marina Tabassum, and Michael Murphy, moderated by Rahul Mehrotra
Monday, February 22, 2016, 6:30 pm
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South S010, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Lunchtime Lecture with Vo Trong Nghia
Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 1:00 pm
Portico 124, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy Street

Please contact  Michael Haggerty, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, haggerty@gsd.harvard.edu, with questions.

Cosponsored with the Boston Society of Architects Foundation, Harvard Asia Center, and Harvard Mellon Urban Initiative.

START
Mon, Feb 22, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 02:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

UPDATED rethinkinglocal
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Mon, November 9, 2015 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Capitals of Postcolonial Pakistan: Urbanism as a discourse of Territorial Selfhood

Urbanization Seminar

Farhan Karim, Assistant Professor The University of Kansas, School of Architecture, Design, and Planning

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

In the two decades following the creation of Pakistan, the government embarked on a lofty project to establish Muslim nationalism as a two pronged symbol: a binding factor for the country’s culturally different east and west wings and a liberating force for the emerging Third World. A major focus of the project was to establish a new executive capital in West Pakistan—Islamabad (established 1959), and a provincial citadel capital in East Pakistan—Sher-e-Bangla Nagar. These two new capitals were conceived as the backdrop to accommodate the new quintessential democratic institutions: parliament buildings, universities, education training centers and polytechnic institutes. However, Pakistan’s shortage of architects and urban planners, in tandem with the country’s martial government’s Cold War leaning towards the Unite States, eventually compelled the government to seek technical assistance from USAID and the Ford Foundation, and commissioned Constantine Doxiadis and Louis Kahn to design Islamabad and Sher-e-Bangla Nagar respectively. The main challenge in designing the two capitals, though they varied significantly in scale, was to establish the new urban setting as the spatial means to manifest and foster a sense of postcolonial selfhood, Muslim nationalism, citizenship, and economic developmentalism. The other concurrent urban design projects in Pakistan, such as Korangi located southeast of Karachi and the largest slum clearance and urban rehabilitation project of its time, complemented the efforts of establishing new capitals by promoting urban space as an apparatus or a spatial armature to transform the placeless and stateless Muslim selfhood into legitimate citizens. Through a critical discussion of different urban design aspects of these two capitals the proposed talk will show that the discursive formation of urban design in postcolonial Pakistan was entangled with the newly anointed citizenship, territoriality and the idea of a composite Muslim self. Urban design was deployed as a metaphor, if not a means to display and exercise the new Pakistani government’s authoritative power, that symbolizes the aspiration of postcolonial identity and selfhood in a complex way.

START
Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1109 karim
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Tue, October 27, 2015 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Development, Dissent and Architecture in the building of Modern India

Urbanization Seminar

Peter Scriver, Centre for Asian and Middle-Eastern Architecture (CAMEA), University of Adelaide

Chair: Rahul MehrotraProfessor of Urban Design and Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design

In Jawaharlal Nehru’s strategic vision for India’s postcolonial modernization and development, the architecture and urbanism of Chandigarh, the new Punjab State Capital, was of ‘enormous importance’. ‘It hits you on the head, and makes you think’, he famously argued. ‘You may squirm at the impact but it has made you think and imbibe new ideas…’  Though rarely invoked with such a clear and critical purpose, architecture has entered in and out of political consciousness over the course of India’s long march from colonial to global modernity, with its potential both to project change and to recruit resistance to it.

Peter Scriver is Senior Lecturer in Architectural History and Theory in the Centre for Asian and Middle Eastern Architecture at the University of Adelaide, Australia. His books include After the Masters: Contemporary Indian Architecture (Mapin, 1990), Colonial Modernities: Building, Dwelling and Architecture in British India and Ceylon (Routledge, 2007), and India: Modern Architectures in History (Reaktion, 2015)

START
Tue, Oct 27, 2015 at 06:30pm

END
Tue, Oct 27, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1027 Scriver NEW2
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Wed, May 6, 2015 from 09:00am - 06:00pm  /  Stubbins Gund Hall

Planning for Conservation: Looking at Agra

Extreme Urbanism 3
Studio Review with the Participation of The Loeb Fellows

Faculty: Rahul Mehrotra

Teaching Associate: Jose Mayoral Moratilla

Teaching Assistant: Vineet Diwadkar

 Open to the public

START
Wed, May 6, 2015 at 09:00am

END
Wed, May 6, 2015 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Stubbins Gund Hall

ADDRESS
Harvard Graduate School of Design
48 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

150504_Review poster_extreme Urbanism III
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