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SAI Event Topic : Graduate Student Associate


Thu, March 30, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Old Stories in New Moments: Digambara Jain Rāmāyaṇa Literature in Early Modernity

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Gregory Clines, Ph.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Catherine HartmannPh.D. Candidate, Committee on the Study of Religion

The fifteenth-century author Brahma Jinadāsa, a member of the Digambara Balatkāra Gaṇa, is credited with composing over eighty works in both Sanskrit and Old Gujarati. One of those compositions was the Padmapurāṇa, a Jain version of the story of Rāma composed in Sanskrit. In the introduction to the work, Jinadāsa acknowledges that his Padmapurāṇa is based off of the acclaimed poet Raviṣeṇa’s seventh-century work of the same name. This talk examines the relationship between the two works, analyzing the literary changes that Jinadāsa makes to his precursor’s text and the social implications of those changes.

 

START
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 30, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0330 Clines_
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Tue, February 28, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Strength in Numbers: How Women’s Networks Close India’s Political Gender Gap

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Soledad PrillamanPh.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Zeynep Pamuk, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University

In India there persists a striking gender gap in political participation and representation, despite several decades of targeted policy interventions. Women’s political participation is important not only on normative grounds of inclusion, but because we know that when women do participate, politics changes. Prillaman presents a theoretical model of political behavior in rural India which argues that women’s lack of political participation is the result of coordinated political behavior in the household. Prillaman then argues and shows that women’s access to networks of other women is one channel through which we can see a shift towards a gender-inclusive equilibrium, even when resource allocations, social norms, and household dynamics would suggest otherwise.

START
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

0228 Prillaman
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Thu, December 1, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Candidate Connections vs. Party Performance: How do Voters Choose in a Low Information Environment?

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Asad Liaqat, Doctoral candidate, Public Policy PhD program, Harvard Kennedy School

Discussant: Sharan Mamidipudi, Doctoral candidate, Public Policy PhD program, Harvard Kennedy School

We investigate the relationship between candidates’ connections, party performance, and voting in the 2015 local government elections in Pakistan combining: (i) data on political connections between candidates and more senior politicians; (ii) a large scale field experiment; and (iii) direct measurement of election outcomes. Providing information on past party performance effects citizen satisfaction with the government, but not support for candidates from the ruling party. Providing information on connections does effect support. Consistent with the experimental results, more connected candidates receive more votes and are more likely to win office, but there is no detectable electoral benefit to past service provision. The results have strong implications for democratic accountability in many settings.

This paper is co-authored with Michael Callen (UCSD), Ali Cheema (Lahore University of Management Sciences), Adnan Khan (LSE), Farooq Naseer (Lahore University of Management Sciences) and Jake Shapiro (Princeton University).

 

START
Thu, Dec 1, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 1, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

1201 Poster
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