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SAI Event Faculty : Parimal G. Patil


Thu, April 7, 2016 from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

CANCELLED: Not Poor but Pauperized

This event has been cancelled.

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Jan Breman, Professor, SOAS, University of London

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

START
Thu, Apr 7, 2016 at 12:00 pm

END
Thu, Apr 7, 2016 at 1:30 pm

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Mon, October 19, 2015 from 05:00pm - 06:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Knowing through Others: Testimony as a Source of Knowledge in Classical Indian Philosophy of Religion

GSA Seminar

Rosanna Picascia, SAI Graduate Student Associate, PhD candidate in the Study of Religion 

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

This talk will look at the debate among Sanskrit philosophers of religion over whether, and the conditions under which, testimony is a source of knowledge.  In particular, it will focus on the epistemic status of scripture, the example par excellence of testimony. What makes scripture an interesting case to look at is that it often speaks about nonempirical objects, such as heaven, which are incapable of being directly verified. Moreover, the fact that scriptural testimony varies among different religious traditions poses a challenge to testimonially-based religious belief. This talk will explore the ways in which South Asian philosophers of religion in first millennium India approached these issues, while additionally drawing upon contemporary discussions in the epistemology of testimony.

 

START
Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 05:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

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Fri, April 24, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

The Future of Capitalism in India

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Prasannan Parthasarathi, Professor of History, Boston College

Amit Basole, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts-Boston

Discussant: Sanjay G ReddyAssociate Professor of Economics and Co-Academic Director of the India-China Institute, The New School for Social Research

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

What are the historical roots of the economic and ecological crises associated with neoliberal capitalism in contemporary India?  How might we imagine alternative visions of development, which might work to ameliorate problems of jobless growth, agricultural decline, and ecological destruction?  This panel discussion will address these questions through explorations of economic and ecological transformations in nineteenth-century India (Prasannan Parthasarathi) and contemporary approaches to sustainable development drawing on immanent knowledge and collectivities (Amit Basole).  The presentations will offer reflections on the possible futures of capitalism, development, and ecology in India.

Co-sponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies and the Harvard US-India Initiative (HUII)

 

START
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0424 Capitalism Poster _V2 - Copy (2)
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Fri, April 3, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

Language of Metaphysics, Language for Politics: Some Lessons from Allama Prabhu’s Vacanas

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi, Assistant Professor of History, Karnataka State Open University.

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

The seminar will focus on the vacanas of Allama Prabhu, the 12th century vacanākara (maker of vacanas) and mystic. More specifically, the seminar will discuss Allama’s attitude towards language, especially its ability to describe the transcendental, and his distinctive mode of composing vacanas. Allama doesn’t believe that anubhāva, the mystical divine experience, can be articulated through poetry, and thus sets up for his poetry an impossibility as its task: articulation of the inarticulable. Allama develops a distinctive style by deploying Tantric vocabulary, and by using allusive propositions.

Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi’s reading of Allama’s vacanas will center around two themes. First, what we may learn from Allama’s attitude towards language especially in presenting the transcendental through poetry? Sobhi consider this to be a particularly salient question in the context of political Hindutva, and Allama’s reluctance to use language to speak about Siva might offer us new ways of discussing religion in the political sphere. Sobhi’s second theme focuses on his use of allusive propositions as a formal method to think about the world. Unlike Nāgārjuna or Digñāga, Allama is not a formal, systematic thinker. His engagement of other Indian intellectuals and their ideas is through the vacana mode. Are there any philosophical and hermeneutical lessons in Allama’s poetry?

START
Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 3, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0403 Poster edited - Copy
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Fri, March 28, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Gandhi on Courage, Ethics and Society

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Uday Mehta, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, The City University of New York

Discussant: Shankar Ramaswami, South Asia Institute South Asian Studies Postdoctoral Fellow

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Uday Singh Mehta, distinguished professor of political science, is a renowned political theorist whose work encompasses a wide spectrum of philosophical traditions. He has worked on a range of issues including the relationship between freedom and imagination, liberalism’s complex link with colonialism and empire, and, more recently, war, peace, and nonviolence. He is the author of two books, The Anxiety of Freedom: Imagination and Individuality in the Political Thought of John Locke (Cornell University Press, 1992) and Liberalism and Empire: Nineteenth Century British Liberal Thought (University of Chicago Press, 1999), which won the J. David Greenstone Book Award from the American Political Science Association in 2001 for the best book in history and theory. In 2002, he was named a Carnegie Foundation scholar. He is currently completing a book on war, peace, and nonviolence, which focuses on the moral and political thought of M. K. Gandhi. He received his undergraduate education at Swarthmore College, where he studied mathematics and philosophy. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from Princeton University.

Cosponsored by the Department of South Asian Studies

START
Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Mehta Poster
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Thu, December 5, 2013 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Chakravyuh (Lotus Maze): Travails, Entanglements, and Visions of Migrant Workers in Delhi

South Asia Without Borders Seminar
Shankar Ramaswami, South Asia Institute South Asian Studies Postdoctoral Fellow
Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

This presentation will explore migrant workers’ experiences, aspirations, and world-views in Delhi, drawing on fieldwork among metal workers in the Okhla Industrial Area.  The presentation invokes the image of the chakravyuh (lotus maze), a labyrinthine military formation arising in the Mahabharata, to understand workers’ entanglements in the factory, neighborhood, and family, and growing attachments in the city.


Cosponsored by the Department of South Asian Studies

START
Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Poster Migrant worker 2
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Sat, September 21, 2013 at 09:15am to
Sun, September 22, 2013 at 03:30pm  /  Thompson Room, Barker Center

Mind & Attention in Indian Philosophy

South Asia Without Borders Workshop

Organized by:
Parimal G. Patil, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University
Susanna Siegel, Department of Philosophy, Harvard University
Sebastian Watzl, Center for the Study of Mind in Nature, University of Oslo

View full schedule here.

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Mind and Nature, Oslo, the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University, the Department of Philosphy at Harvard University, the Network for Sensory Research, and the Harvard University South Asia Institute

START
Sat, Sep 21, 2013 at 09:15am

END
Sun, Sep 22, 2013 at 03:30pm

VENUE
Thompson Room
Barker Center

ADDRESS
12 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Mind and Attention Poster
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Thu, April 25, 2013 at 01:00 pm to
Fri, April 26, 2013 at 03:15 pm  /  Inn at Harvard

South Asia Institute Annual Symposium

Visit the Conference website for more details

START
Thu, Apr 25, 2013 at 01:00 pm

END
Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 03:15 pm

VENUE
Inn at Harvard

ADDRESS
1201 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA

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Fri, March 29, 2013 from 04:00 pm - 05:30 pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

Extraordinary Law at the Colonial Frontier: Notes on the East India Company Archive

Extraordinary Law at the Colonial Frontier: Notes on the East India Company Archive

Bhavani RamanAssistant Professor of History; David L. Rike University Preceptor in History; Princeton University

Chair: Parimal PatilProfessor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Co-sponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

We often think of martial law being deployed upon suspension of municipal law in the context of urban civil unrest. Raman draws on East India Company archives from the Madras and Bengal Presidencies to argue that in India between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, martial law is deployed in largely unsettled, jungle-infested frontier lands in contexts in which municipal law is absent. At stake in this use of martial law is the ability of the British East India Company – then a corporate sovereign power – to designate certain inhabitants as “rebellious” in order to justify the acquisition of their land and resources.

Raman’s discussion of martial law takes us beyond its immediate economic repercussions to its long-term effects. Martial law is used in this context with the specific intent of restricting free trade and expanding the agrarian resources of a trading company – all in the name of security and protection. Examples drawn from this context, Raman argues compellingly, will contribute to current conversations about the aims and effects of emergency law in various international contexts.

Written by Deonnie Moodie, PhD Candidate at GSAS

 

 

 

 

 

 

START
Fri, Mar 29, 2013 at 04:00 pm

END
Fri, Mar 29, 2013 at 05:30 pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

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