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SAI Event Faculty : Ali Asani


Mon, March 27, 2017 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Conversation on the Intersection of Culture, Journalism and Religion

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Madeeha Syed, Pakistani Journalist

Marco Werman, The World

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Join Pakistani journalist Madeeha Syed, Marco Werman from Public Radio International’s The World, and Ali S. Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures at Harvard University, for a conversation about the intersection of culture, journalism and religion in today’s global environment.

The conversation is cosponsored by the Center Stage program of New England Foundation For The Arts and SAI

Reception to follow.

START
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0327 Syed Werman
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Mon, March 6, 2017 from 04:30pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Dastangoi: The art of Urdu storytelling

*Please not the change in start time.

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Ankit Chadha, Storyteller / Author

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Dastangoi, the lost art of Urdu storytelling, developed in eighth century A.D. around the adventures of an Arab hero, Amir Hamza. These stories became very popular in the 19th century North India. With the demise of the last known exponent of the art form in 1928, Mir Baqar Ali, the form also died with him. The modern revival has seen not just the performance of the traditional stories from the Hamza dastan, but also the adaptations of more local and contemporary themes. Ankit Chadha, a writer and storyteller, has been a practitioner of Dastangoi since 2010. His writing varies from biographical accounts of personalities like Kabir, Rahim, Dara Shikoh and Majaaz to modern folk tales on corporate culture, internet and mobile technology. Ankit also has works for young audiences and has worked on Urdu adaptations of children’s classics; including Alice and The Little Prince. He is the author of the award-winning book for children, My Gandhi Story, and the recently released, Amir Khusrau – The Man in Riddles.

 

START
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 04:30pm

END
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0306 Chadha
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Tue, January 17, 2017 from 07:00pm - 08:30pm  /  Lahore, Pakistan

Misaq-e-Ishq: The Covenant of Love

Cosponsored Event

The Lahore Biennale Foundation, the LUMS School of Education and the Harvard South Asia Institute present

An Evening dedicated to Music, Poetry and the Arts
Misaq-e-Ishq: The Covenant of Love

Featuring

Music and poetry recital by
Ali Sethi

With Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim Religion and Cultures at Harvard University

And an introduction to the inaugural Lahore Biennale by Artistic Director Rashid Rana
Location: Ali Institute of Education, Main Auditorium, Ferozepur Road

A music-and-poetry recital around the Sufi ideal of Love. Spanning many regions, languages and eras, the ensemble touches upon the works of regional masters and Sufi visionaries Amir Khusraw, Shams Sabzwari, Bulleh Shah, and Shah Abdul Latif.
Donations will be used to promote the arts and education.

This event is supported by
Institute for Policy Reforms

For Event Passes, contact 0321-948-6822

Facebook Event

START
Tue, Jan 17, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Tue, Jan 17, 2017 at 08:30pm

VENUE
Lahore, Pakistan

ADDRESS
Lahore, Pakistan

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Mon, April 25, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Music and Satire in Pakistan

Muslim Societies in South Asia and Art Seminar

Ali Aftab Saeed with Saad Sultan, Musicians

Chair: Ali AsaniProfessor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Satire is one of the most prominent forms of expression in Pakistani art. Most of the television hits that have surfaced in Pakistan’s rich art industry have been predicated around satire and have received great plaudits from critics and viewers alike. Musical satire is appealing, as the melody is intriguing for the listeners, and even if they don’t always agree with the message. Saeed and Sultan will discuss the role of musical satire in Pakistan, as well as the creation of their band, Beygairat Brigade, whose hits like “Dhinak Dhinak” and “Aalu Anday” have spread awareness while also entertaining audiences.

About Ali Aftab Saeed with Saad Sultan:

Ali Aftab Saeed is a singer, songwriter, performer, producer, activist, and one of the most influential artists working in Pakistan today. Saeed, and his band Beygairat Brigade, first electrified the Pakistani music scene with their song “Alu Andey” (Potatoes and Eggs) in 2011, a pop song infused with biting political criticism of the Pakistani government in the wake of the assassination of the moderate governor of Punjab Province, Salman Taseer. The video was a viral hit, and Saeed and his bandmates quickly became international news, with interviews and extensive discussions of the impact of their music and message appearing in mainstream media across Pakistan and India, as well as American media outlets such as the New York Times and Voice of America. The band has followed up with several more well-received tracks since, each one even more targeted in its satirical social and political critique.

Saeed has recently released the collaborative album Gao Suno Badlo (Sing Listen Change), featuring tracks and videos dedicated to such issues as women’s empowerment and equal access to education, to extraordinary critical acclaim. His current project focuses on recruiting promising young musicians at colleges and universities across Pakistan to collaborate an on album of peace songs combatting the radicalization of Pakistan. His production agency, Mishermayl will provide these young musicians with professional training and logistical support to record, shoot music videos, and launch them on social media.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program

 

START
Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0425 Final Poster
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Fri, February 26, 2016 from 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Muslim Saints and Hindu Daughters: Kinship, Ethical Self-Fashioning, and Inter-religious Relations at Firoz Shah Kotla Dargah, Delhi

Muslim Societies in South Asia

Anand V. Taneja, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Department of Anthropology, Asian Studies Program, Graduate Department of Religion, Vanderbilt University

Chair: Ali AsaniProfessor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Relations between religions in South Asia have been seen as marked by either competition or syncretism. Is there another way of understanding the inter-religious interaction? Turning to the interactions between Muslims and Hindus at the popular Muslim saint-shrine of Firoz Shah Kotla in Delhi, Taneja offers another model in this talk—one of religions opening up new potentialities of ethical life and self-fashioning for the others they interact with, without either “conversion” or the dilution of doctrinal specificity. At Firoz Shah Kotla, the ethics of social interaction are anti-identitarian. People actively avoid asking each other’s names, which easily identify one’s religious community and caste. Instead, people follow an ethic of nameless intimacy, where they become friends and share intimate secrets while, on one level, remaining strangers. Women, for example, freely express their disaffection with the often oppressive structures of their natal and marital families. The ability to form communities of hamdardi (shared pain/empathy) while stepping out of one’s socially determined identity, Taneja argues, is a major factor in the healing power of Muslim saint shrines such as Firoz Shah Kotla. This healing efficacy can be linked to anti-patriarchal strands within Islam and to the Islamic ethic of gharib-navazi (hospitality to strangers/others), associated in particular with the Chishtiya Sufi order in South Asia. By offering us a model of Islam as an ethical inheritance as opposed to a religious identity, Firoz Shah Kotla forces us to rethink normative ideas of religion, and the role of Islam in the ethical and religious life of North India.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program

START
Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm

END
Fri, Feb 26, 2016 at 5:30 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0226 Taneja
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Fri, October 2, 2015 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  Thompson Room, Barker Center

Reflections: A Conversation with Salim and Sulaiman Merchant

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Read a summary of the event here.

Salim and Sulaiman Merchant, Musicians and composers

Moderator: Ali AsaniProfessor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

The Merchant brothers, Salim and Sulaiman, rank among the most dynamic and talented musicians and composers in South Asia today. The breadth and range of their musical ability attests to their intrinsic genius: from award winning musical scores and compositions in Indian and American cinema to collaborations with some of the most talented and ground-breaking musicians of our times.  Salim and Sulaiman will reflect on their musical careers and some of their widely acclaimed compositions inspired by Islam’s rich tradition of spirituality and artistic expression.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program

START
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Thompson Room
Barker Center

ADDRESS
12 Quincy St
Cambridge, MA 02138

Merchant Event Poster
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Mon, April 13, 2015 from 04:00pm - 06:00pm  /  CGIS South, S020 Belfer

Perspectives: A Conversation with Rohail Hyatt

Arts Initiative and Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Rohail Hyatt, Producer, Coke Studio; actor; film composer; rock music artist; and keyboardist

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Hyatt will discuss the laws of nature in contrast to the current state of global music standards. Like genetically altered food, our sense of what is considered ‘musical’ seems to have been altered too. In the eastern world, music is considered to be the ‘food for the soul’. Do we know what are we feeding our souls lately? Has organic music completely died, or will there be a resurgence in this field as in the case of the food industry?

Co-sponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program

START
Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 06:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S020 Belfer
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

0413  Hyatt poster 2 - Copy
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Thu, April 2, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Empire from the Edges: Shi‘i and Messianic Challenges to Mughal Authority

Updated location: CGIS South S153

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Samira Sheikh, Associate Professor of History; Associate Professor of Asian Studies Program; Affiliated Faculty, Islamic Studies Program; Co-Director Vanderbilt History Seminar, Vanderbilt University.

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Shi`i and messianic groups in Gujarat evolved an often uncomfortable coexistence with Mughal political authority, one that was eased by occasionally imperial diktat but was regularly punctuated by bouts of violence and repression. This seminar will examine Mughal relations with three such groups from the late sixteenth century to the early eighteenth, paying attention to local politics and raising the question of whether Akbar’s supposed “tolerance” and Aurangzeb’s assumed “bigotry” are useful frames for discussion of empire, religion, and region.

Co-sponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program

START
Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

0402 Poster - Copy
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Thu, March 12, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Sufi Shrines and the Secular State

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Anna B. Bigelow, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies, North Carolina State University

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University

Sufi tomb shrines in India are well-known for their multi-religious constituencies. Yet the status of these sites is contested and ambivalent, with some groups lauding and celebrating them while others seek to undermine their diverse appeal. This presentation will compare cases of cooperation and conflict at two sites in Karnataka to explore the pragmatics of state secularism as well as local strategies of accommodation and competition.

Cosponsored with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program

START
Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Mar 12, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Bigelow poster
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