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SAI Event Faculty : Akshay Mangla


Fri, April 22, 2016 from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S153

East India Company Revisited

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Atul KohIi, David K.E. Bruce Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.

START
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 2:00 pm

END
Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

4.22.16-Kohli
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Fri, March 4, 2016 from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Voters and Foreign Policy: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Pakistan

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Christopher ClaryPostdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University

In traditional surveys in Pakistan, the vast majority of respondents identify India as an enemy and a serious threat to Pakistan. Do these beliefs affect voter choices? In a novel survey experiment, we find that voters punish politicians who advocate a friendly policy toward India, but only modestly. Candidate attitudes toward India were the least meaningful characteristic for voter choice among five characteristics tested.

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.

START
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 2:00 pm

END
Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 4:00 pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Christopher Clary
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Fri, February 5, 2016 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K354

Why Regional Parties? Clientelism, Elites, and the Indian Party System

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Adam Ziegfeld, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Today, regional parties in India win nearly as many votes as national parties. Ziegfeld questions the conventional wisdom that regional parties in India are electorally successful because they harness popular grievances and benefit from strong regional identities. Rather, in democracies where patronage, vote buying, and electoral handouts are common, regional parties are successful because they represent expedient options for office-seeking politicians.

Cosponsored with Brown University, MIT, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs

Reception to follow.

START
Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K354
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA

Adam Ziegfeld
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Tue, November 10, 2015

CANCELLED: To the Brink and Back: India’s 1991 Story

This event has been cancelled and will be rescheduled. 

Book Talk

Jairam Ramesh, Member of Parliament; Former Minister of Environment and Rural Development

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

To The Brink and Back is an account of the events leading to the path-breaking economic liberalisation unveiled by Rao’s government with Manmohan Singh as the Union finance minister.

Cosponsored with the India & South Asia Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

START
Tue, Nov 10, 2015

END
Tue, Nov 10, 2015

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Thu, October 30, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Powerplay: Teacher Transfers in India

SAI Education Seminar

Tara Beteille, World Bank

Chair: Akshay ManglaAssistant Professor, Harvard Business School

This paper provides a detailed account of how the system of teacher transfers operates in large parts of India. It presents evidence to suggest that teacher transfers form the bedrock of a patronage-based low-accountability school system. Politicians need teachers because teachers are politically powerful and can convincingly threaten them with electoral sabotage. This deters politicians from adopting strict teacher accountability policies. Knowing how powerful teachers can be in the collective, politicians attempt to control the behavior of individual teachers through patronage-based transfers. But reality is not as neat and clean, and it is difficult to point fingers at specific politicians, else the task of accountability might have been easier. This happens because of the profusion of middlemen, who promise to connect teachers to politicians. Middlemen sometimes fabricate instances of bribery, preying on informational asymmetries and an institutionalized belief in corruption. They generate a system of beliefs regarding corruption in transfers that becomes self-fulfilling. Grim as the situation may appear, the paper offers hope based upon the recent experience of two states in India.

Cosponsored with the International Education Policy Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

Read about the event.

START
Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

PowerPlay_103014
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Tue, September 30, 2014 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

The future of Indian Higher Education: Four case studies


Education Seminar

Pramath Raj Sinha, Founding Dean of the Indian School of Business and a founder of Ashoka University

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor, Harvard Business School

“Everyone knows Indian Higher Education is a mess. Proposals for its transformation abound, but things continue to go from bad to worse. Despite the doom and gloom, there are several recent experiments that attempt to challenge the status quo and set an example. This talk is a first-hand account of building new and transforming existing higher education institutions in India.”

Cosponsored with the International Education Policy Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

START
Tue, Sep 30, 2014 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Sep 30, 2014 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Future of Indian Higher Education 093014
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Fri, April 4, 2014 from 02:30pm - 04:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel K031

The State and the Market in the Delivery of Primary Education in India: Theory and Evidence

Education Seminar

Karthik Muralidharan, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of California, San Diego

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Cosponsored with the Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics (Brown Watson Institute, Harvard Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and MIT Center for International Studies)

START
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 02:30pm

END
Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 04:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel K031

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA 02138

updated poster
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Tue, February 18, 2014 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Brittle Forge: Higher Education and India’s Human Capital

Education Seminar

Devesh Kapur,  Associate Professor of Political Science, Madan Lal Sobti Associate Professor for the Study of Contemporary India, and Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of India, University of Pennsylvania

Chair: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Higher Education in India is going through profound changes, not just in scale but in means and ends. What are the the nature and character of these changes? How can one understand and explain these changes within India’s complex political, institutional and social realities? And what are its consequences for India’s economy,  social empowerment and democratic politics?

Cosponsored with the International Education Policy program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

START
Tue, Feb 18, 2014 at 12:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 18, 2014 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

HigherEd Poster final
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Fri, October 4, 2013 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Attaining Education for All : How do India and China compare?

Education Seminar

Abhimanyu Singh, Director and Representative, UNESCO Office Beijing
Discussant: Akshay Mangla, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Cosponsored with the Asia Center Modern Asia Seminar

While much international attention has been paid to the recent rapid rise of China and India in  economic terms, there has been relatively little focus on their efforts in the equally critical domain of developing human capabilities through the provision of basic education and adult literacy. China and India both emerged as sovereign nations in the mid-twentieth century with roughly comparable levels of literacy but have since followed distinctive approaches to education.This talk will examine and compare the progress and identify challenges in these domains  within the framework of Education for All (EFA), a  global agenda launched at Jomtien   in 1990 and reaffirmed in Dakar in 2000.

Abhimanyu Singh is Director of the UNESCO Office Beijing and UNESCO Representative to the PRC, DRK, Japan, Mongolia and the Republic of Korea. From 2006 to 2008, Singh served as Director of the UNESCO Office in Abuja, Nigeria. From 2001 to 2006 he led the global coordination and monitoring of the Education for All (EFA) movement at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris. From 1974-2000, as a member of the Indian Administrative Service (IAS), the premier civil service of the country, Singh held key leadership positions at various levels of National and Provincial Governments. He chaired the global drafting committee at the World Education Forum at Dakar in 2000.As a mid-career professional he was a Hubert Humphrey Fellow at the University of Pittsburgh, USA

Lunch will be served.

START
Fri, Oct 4, 2013 at 12:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 4, 2013 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Poster_Update_Attaining Education for All
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