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Upcoming SAI Events


Wed, September 28, 2016 from 02:30pm - 03:00pm  /  CGIS South

Weekly Tea Break

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

*Please note the change in time

START
Wed, Sep 28, 2016 at 02:30pm

END
Wed, Sep 28, 2016 at 03:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

chai-975685_960_720
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Thu, September 29, 2016 from 04:00pm - 07:30pm  /  Knafel Center

Film screening: Trafficked

Cosponsored Event

Please join the Carr Center for a screening of the new movie “Trafficked”, based on the award winning book ‘Sex Trafficking’ by Carr Center Fellow Siddharth Kara, and directed by Will Wallace.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion, with time for questions from the audience.

Siddharth Kara, Adjunct Lecturer of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Author of “Sex Trafficking”, Screenwriter & Producer of “Trafficked”

Swanee Hunt, Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Anne Archer, Academy Award-nominated actress, lead of “Trafficked”, activist

Moderator: Sushma Raman, Executive Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

Cosponsored with the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

START
Thu, Sep 29, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 29, 2016 at 07:30pm

VENUE
Knafel Center

ADDRESS
10 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Poster
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Thu, September 29, 2016 from 12:30pm - 01:30pm  /  Bldg-1, Rm 1208

Fulfilling the Health SDG in India: Some Old and New Concerns

Cosponsored Event

Gita Sen, Distinguished Professor & Director, Ramalingaswami Centre on Equity & Social Determinants of Health, Public Health Foundation of India

This series features current research of members and affiliates of Global Health and Population, HSPH.  The intent is to both educate and raise the awareness of our community and beyond, about the research activities presently being conducted by faculty, students, researchers and special guests of the department.

START
Thu, Sep 29, 2016 at 12:30pm

END
Thu, Sep 29, 2016 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Bldg-1, Rm 1208, HSPH

ADDRESS
665 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115

Poster
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Fri, September 30, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Governance for Development — Political and Administrative Reforms for Bangladesh

Book Talk

S. Nazrul Islam, Senior Economic Affairs Officer, Development Policy Analysis Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations

Chair: Prithwiraj Choudhury, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

Analyzing Bangladesh’s governance problems and drawing insights that will be relevant to other developing countries, this book sharpens our understanding of governance and suggests political and administrative reforms to improve governance and facilitate faster development.

START
Fri, Sep 30, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 30, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0930 Islam
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Wed, October 5, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Puja and the Space between Devotee and God: An Anthropology of Atmosphere

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Frank Heidemann, Professor, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Chair: Richard Wolf, Professor of Music and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

In puja, a Hindu act of worship, the relationship between devotee and God is transformed and the space between them altered. Using case studies of the Badagas in the Nilgiri hills of South India, this presentation analyzes puja in light of the New Phenomenology and Gernot Böhme’s philosophy of atmosphere.

Atmosphere, according to Böhme, is the quality of a surrounding space, as perceived by all the senses and the felt body (Leib). It is an intersubjective, fluid, dynamic totality: a total social fact. The perceiving persons are co-producers and part of the atmosphere, but they consider it an external, “half thing” (Halbding). Atmospheres create social realities, contextual norms, and have an impact on the emotional state of individuals. Every society has specialists who strategically construct and monitor the process of creating atmospheres. Puja and other activities of priests produce particular religious atmospheres and contribute to a shared emotional state among devotees. In other contexts atmospheres contribute to what Heidemann calls “social proprioception.” He argue for an anthropology of atmosphere that investigates the production and perception of social atmospheres and their ontologies.

Cosponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies

START
Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 5, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

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Thu, October 6, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S010

What the Fields Remember

Film Screening

Subsari Krishnan, Filmmaker

Shankar RamaswamiLecturer on South Asian Studies; Director of Undergraduate Studies. Harvard University

On 18th February 1983, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, more than 2000 Muslims were killed in the town of Nellie and its surrounding villages in Assam, India. People’s homes were burnt down and their fields destroyed. Most of those who died were old people, women and children. Till date the Nellie massacre, remains on the margins of India’s public history, and is virtually wiped out from the nation’s collective memory.

The documentary film What the Fields Remember revisits the massacre three decades later. From the survivors, Sirajuddin Ahmed and Abdul Khayer’s, retelling of the event, and their struggles of coping with loss and memories that refuse to fade away, the film attempts to explore ideas of violence, memory and justice. It also tries to understand how physical spaces that have witnessed the violence continue to mark people’s relationship to history and memory. What the Fields Remember also attempts to raise larger questions around collective memory – of what we choose to remember and why we choose to forget.

START
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

1006 Fields
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Fri, October 7, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Subalternity and Resistance in India’s Bhil Heartland: Historical Trajectories, Contemporary Scenarios

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Alf Nilsen, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Bergen

Chair: Ajantha Subramanian, Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

This paper aims to contribute to discussions of subaltern politics in contemporary India through an investigation of the character and trajectory of democratic mobilisation among Bhil Adivasis in western Madhya Pradesh. Grounded in a critical dialogue with recent Foucauldian approaches to the study of popular politics in India, this paper explores how subalternity is simultaneously constituted and contested in and through state-society relations. The first part of the paper outlines the contours of contemporary Adivasi subalternity in the Bhil heartland of western India, focusing in particular on the “everyday tyranny” of the local state. I then show how the historical origins of Bhil political subalternity can be traced to the restructuring of sovereignty that occurred across the tribal heartland of western India under as a result of colonial state-making projects that unfolded from the end of the Anglo-Maratha wars onwards, and how the power relations that were constituted in this process were reproduced in western Madhya Pradesh after independence. The third and final part of the paper analyzes the ways in which Bhil social movements in the region mobilized to democratize local state-society relations in the 1980s and 1990s. I read this resistance as revolving around forms of legalism from below which produced the rudiments of a civil society and an insurgent form of citizenship centred on collective resource control and self-determination. In conclusion, I reflect on what conceptual lessons the trajectories of these movements hold for the study of subalterity, resistance, and state-society relations in India today.

 

 

START
Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

1007 Nilsen
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Fri, October 14, 2016 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K354

New Potions in Old Bottles: Explaining the Differential Control of Smallpox in 19th Century Canton and Calcutta

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Prerna SinghMahatma Gandhi Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Chair: Ashutosh VarshneySol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

START
Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K354
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA

Capture
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Mon, October 17, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Urbanization in South Asia: Conversations from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh

Urbanization Seminar

Dr. A Ravindra, Chairman, Institute for Social & Economic Change, Bangalore

Adnan Morshed, Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning, the Catholic University of America 

Mubbashir RizviAssistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Georgetown University

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

This panel brings together three urban scholars and practitioners from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and it deals with the contemporary challenges facing rapid urbanization in South Asia. This panel presents a unique opportunity to have a cross-cutting conversation across South Asian countries to both situate their planning experiences in their specific contexts, but to also ask if there are any commonalities about the South Asian urban experience. It is also a chance to learn about design and planning practices from across neighboring boundaries.

 

START
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

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Mon, October 17, 2016 from 04:00pm - 06:00pm  /  Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Lower Level Library

Embracing Waterfronts: Dock Worker Solidarities in International Perspective

Cosponsored Event

Shubhankita Ojha, Global Fellow, WIGH; Fellow, South Asia Institute, Harvard University; University of Delhi, India

Commentator: Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

Graduate Student Commentator: Rudi Batzell, PhD Candidate in History, Harvard University

Cosponsored with the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History

START
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Lower Level Library

ADDRESS
Robinson Hall, 35 Quincy Street, Lower Level Library

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Wed, October 19, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K050

Energy Access in Remote Communities – A Practitioner’s Experience

Science, Technology, and Energy Seminar

Anshuman Lath, Co-Founder, Gram Oorja 

Chair: Ignacio Perez-ArriagaVisiting professor, MIT; Professor and Director of the BP Chair on Sustainable Development, Comillas University

Gram Oorja Solutions Private Limited (www.gramoorja.in), founded in 2007, has worked in over 120 remote villages of India, providing electricity, drinking water and cooking fuel to tribal communities. A key feature of the work has been the sustainability of these projects, with local communities taking over the management, tariff collection duties and ownership of these projects. Anshuman, a co-founder of the company, will share his experiences with the company.

 

START
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K050

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

go1
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Thu, October 27, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Gender Challenges

Book Talk

Bina Agarwal, Professor of Development Economics and Environment at the University of Manchester

Pauline PetersLecturer in Public Policy, Center for International Development, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Chair: Jacqueline BhabhaFXB Director of Research; Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Lecturer in Law, Harvard Law School; Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School

This panel will discuss Gender Challenges, a three-volume compendium by Professor Bina Agarwal, who is known for her path-breaking writings on agriculture, property rights, and the environment. The compendium brings together a selection of her essays, written over three decades, and is published by Oxford University Press, 2016. Combining diverse disciplines, methodologies, and cross-country comparisons, the essays challenge standard economic analysis and assumptions from a gender perspective. They provide original insights on a wide range of theoretical, empirical, and policy issues of continuing importance in contemporary debates.

START
Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

1027 Agrawal Poster
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Fri, October 28, 2016 - Sat, October 29, 2016  /  CGIS South, S010

DeCoding Asian Urbanism

Special Event

The symposium on DeCoding Asian Urbanism explores the current discourse and creation of innovative architecture and urban interventions that are effectively transforming the spatial and operational landscape of the complex Asian city. The focus is to highlight efforts that strategically embrace the rapid growth and the cultural and physical complexity of the built environment in Asia. The symposium builds on an exhibition at the A+D Architecture +Design Museum>Los Angeles, curated by Kenneth Frampton, Ken Yeang and Farooq Ameen. The comprehensive effort including the exhibition, this symposium and accompanying publication stimulates a dialogue between designers, policy makers and public officials who are shaping the Asian city today.

Cosponsored with the Bengal Foundation and the A+D Museum, Los Angeles

START
Fri, Oct 28, 2016

END
Sat, Oct 29, 2016

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Capture
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Sat, November 5, 2016 from 02:00pm - 03:30pm  /  Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Kumbh Mela, The Ephmeral Megacity

Special Event

This year’s annual SACHI meeting and event will explore the megacity Kumbh Mela and features specialists Diana Eck, professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies at Harvard University, Rahul Mehrota, professor of Urban Design and Planning at Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Tarun Khanna, director of the Harvard South Asia Institute, followed by a short discussion. Moderated by Robert Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit, UC Berkeley.

The Kumbh Mela is a Hindu religious fair that occurs every 12 years in India, and has become the largest public gathering in the world. The most recent observance of the festival took place in 2013 in Allahabad, with an estimated attendance of over 80 million people. Because of its size and complexity, the 2013 Kumbh Mela inspired the Harvard South Asia Institute’s flagship multi-year interdisciplinary research project in a number of complementary fields: business, technology and communications, urban studies and design, religious and cultural studies, and public health. Launched in 2015, the “Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Megacity” book and exhibition consolidate research findings and serve as an example of interdisciplinary research conducted at Harvard.

Free with general museum admission.

Join the reception on the Loggia after the program.

This program is co-presented by the Society for Art & Cultural Heritage of India. It is part of the The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe Programs organized by the Asian Art Museum.

START
Sat, Nov 5, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Sat, Nov 5, 2016 at 03:30pm

VENUE
Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

ADDRESS
200 Larkin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

The above photo, taken by Lisa Kristine, shows the many pilgrims who come to the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India. This January, Harvard faculty and students will join them as part of the Mapping the Kumbh Mela Project.
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Mon, November 14, 2016 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Pipe Politics: Mumbai’s Contested Waters 

Urbanization Seminar

Lisa BjorkmanAssistant Professor of Urban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville

Chair: Sai BalakrishnanAssistant Professor in Urban Planning, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

In the Indian city of Mumbai, two dazzling decades of urban development and roaring economic growth have presided over the steady deterioration – and sometimes spectacular breakdown – of the city’s water infrastructures. Water troubles plague not only the more-than 60% of city residents now reported to live in ‘slums,’ but city elites as well have seen their taps grow increasingly erratic and prone to drying up. The everyday risks of water shortage that infuse the city’s water infrastructures– risks that flow across class lines – are managed and mitigated through the forging and maintenance of elaborate knowledge-exchange networks. Getting water to come out of Mumbai’s pipes is an activity that requires continuous attention to and intimate knowledge of a complex and dynamic social and political hydraulic landscape. Ethnographic attention reveals how water is made to flow by means of intimate forms of knowledge and ongoing intervention in the city’s complex and dynamic social, political, and hydraulic landscape. The everyday work of getting water animates and inhabits a penumbra of infrastructural activity – of business, brokerage, secondary markets and socio-political networks – whose workings are transforming lives as well as reconfiguring and rescaling political authority in the city. Mumbai’s illegible and volatile hydrologies are lending infrastructures increasing political salience just as actual control over pipes and flows becomes contingent upon dispersed and intimate assemblages of knowledge, power, and material authority.

START
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 06:30pm

END
Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

coverimage
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Fri, November 18, 2016 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Who Influences Voters in Rural India? An Experiemental Approach

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Simon Chauchard, Assistant Professor of Government Department, Dartmouth College

Chair: Ashutosh VarshneySol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

START
Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Capture
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SAI Events Archive


Mon, September 26, 2016 from 03:30pm - 05:00pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Grant Opportunities Open House

Student Event

Come learn about SAI summer funding opportunities from past grant recipients. Learn about the various types of grants (research, internship, language), the application process, how to write an appropriate budget for a summer in South Asia, and enjoy some delicious South Asian food.

Learn more about grant opportunities.

Facebook event.

START
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 03:30pm

END
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 05:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

1026 Open House_ - Copy
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Mon, September 26, 2016 from 06:00pm - 07:30pm  /  Andover Chapel

From India: The Rhythms of Life

Cosponsored Event

Featuring music from Sandeep Das (tabla), Rajib Karmaker (sitar) and remarks by Anne Monius, Professor of South Asian Religions

Cosponsored with the Religious Literacy Project, Harvard Divinity School, and MusicUnitesUS, Brandeis University

This event is free and open to the public.

START
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 06:00pm

END
Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 07:30pm

VENUE
Andover Chapel

ADDRESS
45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138

From India The Rhythms of Life_9.26.16.JPG
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Fri, September 23, 2016 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  Watson Institute at Brown University

Development and Politics in Indian Democracy

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Aruna RoyActivist & Founder, MKSS

Aruna Roy is an Indian political and social activist who founded the Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan (MKSS) along with Shankar Singh, Nikhil Dey and many others. The MKSS began by fighting for fair and equal wages for workers which shaped and evolved into a struggle for the enactment of India’s Right to Information Act. Aruna Roy is a leader of the Right to Information movement in India through the MKSS and the National Campaign for People’s Right to Information(NCPRI), which was finally successful with the passage of the Right to Information Act in 2005.

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

 

START
Fri, Sep 23, 2016 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 23, 2016 at 04:00pm

VENUE
Watson Institute at Brown University

ADDRESS
Watson Institute at Brown University, 111 Thayer Street Providence, RI

RoyAruna-450
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Thu, September 22, 2016 - Fri, September 23, 2016  /  Radcliffe Institute

Radcliffe Advanced Seminar: Exchanging Health Information

Special Event

The Exchanging Health Information seminar seeks to bring together experts in medicine, computer science, big data, public policy and law to identify a research and policy agenda that addresses implementation barriers to health information exchange.

Building on international standards in health systems interoperability and learning from best practices from other industries, seminar exercises will employ an emerging economy use case (from India) to anchor the two-day deliberations.

The seminar will focus on the state of health information data; imperatives to exchange data, API-based healthcare ecosystems, and requisite policy levers to facilitate safe, secure, health information flow for clinical and public health good.

Enter the Seminar Page.

START
Thu, Sep 22, 2016

END
Fri, Sep 23, 2016

VENUE
Harvard University
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

ADDRESS
10 Garden St
Cambridge, MA 02138 ‎

File 31-08-15 5 36 50 pm
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Wed, September 21, 2016 from 04:30pm - 05:00pm  /  CGIS South

Weekly Tea Break

Harvard faculty, students, fellows, staff, and affiliates are invited to a weekly tea break at SAI’s office, 4th floor of 1730 Cambridge Street. Come enjoy chai tea and snacks and get to know SAI’s community.

START
Wed, Sep 21, 2016 at 04:30pm

END
Wed, Sep 21, 2016 at 05:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, 4th Floor

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

chai-975685_960_720
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Fri, September 16, 2016 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S354

Directive Principles and Transformative Constitutional Design

Book Talk

Tarunabh KhaitanAssociate Professor and Hackney Fellow in Law, Wadham College, University of Oxford

Chair: Ajantha SubramanianProfessor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Borrowing and developing the concept from Ireland, framers of India’s Constitution inserted a chapter titled ‘directive principles of state policy’ in the founding document. They were a mix of principles aimed at securing what they called an ‘economic democracy’, some guarantees we now call ‘social rights’ and some other curiosities like an exhortation for prohibition and a ban on cow slaughter. These were directed at the political organs of the state and made expressly non-justiciable. Despite being derided by scholars and lawyers as ‘mere pious wishes’ and ‘design flaws’, and (largely) rejected by post-Apartheid South Africa after due consideration, they have been adopted by at least 24 constitutions in Asia and Africa, including very recently by the latest Nepalese Constitution of 2015. India’s cultural influence on these jurisdictions, mostly in the global South, does not seem to provide sufficient explanation for their continued popularity with constitution makers.

Most of the existing scholarship on directive principles has focused on how courts have used these principles, their non-justiciability notwithstanding. In this paper, Khaitan focus on their political character. First, he uses India as a case-study to argue that directive principles are an important tool for successful constitution-making. He identifies the reasons why they became attractive to the framers of the Indian Constitution, and far from being mere pious wishes, they performed important and distinct political functions for the framers. Second, Khaitan shows that insofar as they impose political duties on the state, these duties have a conditional character: their substantive obligatory force becomes manifest only after certain preconditions inherent in reasons for their adoption as directive principles are satisfied. Extrapolating from these Indian findings, he speculates that non-justiciable conditional political duties have particular salience for postcolonial pluralistic societies in the global South seeking to establish a transformative constitutional culture.

START
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S354

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0823 Khaitan
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Fri, September 16, 2016 from 09:00am - 06:00pm  /  Kresge G1, Harvard School of Public Health

Disasters and Development in South Asia

Cosponsored Event

Over a year after Nepal’s earthquake, this conference brings together practitioners, policy-makers, academics, students, and experts in disaster response to examine the importance of risk mitigation, and to discuss the role of development partners, aid accountability and the role of the media in disaster response.

The overarching objectives of this symposium are to share lessons from Nepal’s efforts in disaster preparedness, mitigation, management and reconstruction; and second, to foster dialogue and create links between lessons from other South Asian countries and Nepal’s experience in disaster response. To build relationships between the panelists, Harvard faculty members, Harvard students, and members of the Nepali community in Boston, several sessions including networking lunch, reception and dinner will be organized in addition to the panel discussions. At the end of the symposium, a final report which synthesizes the main ideas and recommendations will be prepared and circulated with the explicit intention of contributing to the existing conversation on building disaster resilient systems in South Asia.

The symposium is Harvard’s first international conference focused on Nepal and is organized by the Office of the Dean of the Harvard. T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and by Harvard Chan Students for Nepal, a student group of Nepali students who have campaigned to ensure the public health community can learn from Nepal’s response to the earthquake.

Click here to learn more and register.

 

START
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 09:00am

END
Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 06:00pm

VENUE
Kresge G1, Harvard School of Public Health

ADDRESS
677 Huntington Ave., Boston

Nepal Symposium_16 Sept 2016
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Thu, September 15, 2016 from 06:00pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

Gandhi’s Forgotten Campaign: The Abolition of Indenture and the Mahatma

Student Event

Presented by the South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop

Mrinalini SinhaAlice Freeman Palmer Professor of History; Professor (by courtesy) of English and Women’s Studies; Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows (2015-), University of Michigan

Respondents:

Sunil AmrithMehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Professor of History

Mou BanerjeePhD Candidate, Dept. of History, Harvard University

Cosponsored by the South Asia Across Disciplines Workshop and the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute

The indentured labor system, which had been put in place in the aftermath of Atlantic slavery to replace emancipated African slaves with indentured Indians on colonial plantations overseas, came under widespread attack by the early decades of the 20th century. M.K. Gandhi’s involvement in the movement for the abolition of indenture, or what following the abolition of Atlantic slavery has been called the “second abolition,” helped launch his political career in India. Yet the campaign against indenture occupies an obscure and undigested role in the scholarship on Gandhi and on modern India. What might it mean to restore abolitionism to its role in the advent of Gandhi’s career in India? What might abolitionism tell us about Gandhi’s signature concepts of swaraj and satyagraha? This talk will shed light on the abolition movement in India and explore its implications for understanding Gandhi’s politics.

START
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 06:00pm

END
Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0915 Sinha
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Wed, September 14, 2016 from 06:00pm - 08:00pm  /  MIT Tang Center

Jazz Goes to Bollywood

Cosponsored Event

MIT-India and the Harvard South Asia Institute present South Asia and Its Diasporas, a speakers series

Naresh Fernandes, Author of Taj Mahal Foxtrot: The Story of Bombay’s Jazz Age

Discussant: Vivek BaldAssociate Professor, Comparative Media Studies/Writing, MIT

In the late 1950s, a period acknowledged as the Golden Era of Hindi film music, Bollywood songs were enlivened by a rather unusual influence: jazz. This presentation will explain how a group of journeymen jazz musicians fleeing racism in the U.S. in the 1930s gave India a taste for hot music, and how these syncopated sounds found their way into the Hindi film studios. It will also explore how political ideas traveled the other way, as African Americans sought Gandhi’s advice on their political struggles.

Naresh Fernandes is the author of Taj Mahal Foxtrot: The Story of Bombay’s Jazz Age. He is the editor of Scroll.in, a digital news publication in Bombay.

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START
Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 06:00pm

END
Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 08:00pm

VENUE
MIT Tang Center, Building E51, Room 275

ADDRESS
2 Amherst Street @ Wadsworth Street, Cambridge, MA

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