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SAI Events


Fri, June 5, 2015 - Sat, June 6, 2015  /  CGIS South, S010

Transformation Challenges and Opportunities for the Bangladesh Garment Industry

Bangladesh Development Conference 2015

This conference will look at identifying and solving the challenges in the transformation of the Bangladesh Garment Industry, analyzing the tools and metrics to measure progress and recommending the best practices for sustainable development.

Participants include:

Government and Non Government Organizations of Bangladesh, USA, and development partner countries, international academics and experts, BGMEA, BKMEA, international brands and retailers, ALLIANCE, ACCORD, workers rights groups, labor organizations, United Nations agencies, international financial institutes.

Cosponsored with SAI, the Harvard University Center for the Environment, and International Sustainable Development Institute, Inc.

Contact: Mohammed Iqbal Yousuf
Conference Coordinator
Harvard Medical School DFCI
mohammed_yousuf@dfci.harvard.edu

June 5, 2015: 12pm to 8pm

June 6, 2015: 8am to 8pm

START
Fri, Jun 5, 2015

END
Sat, Jun 6, 2015

VENUE
CGIS South, S010

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA

Mon, May 4, 2015 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Remaking a nation: Nepal’s tryst with peace, constitutionalism and sovereignty

SAI Book Talk

Prashant Jha, Associate Editor, Hindustan Times.

Chair: Madhav Khosla, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Theory, Department of Government, Harvard University

 

START
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 12:00pm

END
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 01:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Mon, May 4, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Title TBD

Special Event

Dr Isher Judge Ahluwalia, Chairperson, Board of Governors, the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)

Chair: Tarun Khanna, Director, South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Dr Isher Judge Ahluwalia is a renowned Indian economist, with wide experience in the fields of economic growth, productivity, industrial and trade policy reforms, and urban planning and development. She is currently Chairperson on the Board of Governors for the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), a leading think-tank based in New Delhi engaged in policy oriented research. At ICRIER, Dr Ahluwalia is leading a major research and capacity building programme on the challenges of urbanisation in India. She was awarded Padma Bhushan by the President of India in the year 2009 for her services in the field of education and literature.

START
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, May 4, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Mon, April 27, 2015

Title TBD

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Matthew Hull, Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan

Co-sponsored with the Social Anthropology Colloqium

START
Mon, Apr 27, 2015

END
Mon, Apr 27, 2015

Fri, April 24, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

The Future of Capitalism in India

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Prasannan Parthasarathi, Professor of History, Boston College

Amit Basole, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts-Boston.

Discussant: Sanjay G ReddyAssociate Professor of Economics and Co-Academic Director of the India-China Institute, The New School for Social Research.

Chair: Parimal G. Patil, Professor of Religion and Indian Philosophy, Committee on the Study of Religion, FAS, Chair of the Department of South Asian Studies

Co-sponsored with the Department of South Asian Studies and the Harvard US-India Initiative (HUII)

 

START
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

Tue, April 21, 2015 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Building Storeys: An Architect’s journey through the Indian landscape

Urbanization Seminar

Brinda Somaya, Architect and Urban Conservationist.

Chair: Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Whether it involves the restoration of a rural Indian village, the creation of a corporate campus, the rejuvenation of city monuments or the establishment of an academic institution, Brinda Somaya has successfully created a practice that covers the many faces of the Indian landscape. Her reputation has been built on her unique ability to find the appropriate way to build forms that belong. An overview of some of her completed works shows each project having its own original and unique architectural interpretation. This clarity of vision will be presented in a journey through her four decades of practice.
Brinda Somaya will share how she built her practice in India and will focus on the experiences and challenges she faced as she evolved into a leading South-Asian woman architect. Her works include the rehabilitation of an earthquake-devastated village, restoration of an ancient cathedral as well as twentieth century Louis Kahn buildings, creation of educational and information technology campuses, collaboration on the tallest residential tower in India and the conversion of massive garbage dumps into beautiful and usable community parks and plazas. Her talk will take her audience through the enormous changes that India has gone through since independence in 1947 and the challenges it continues to face today with a population of over 1.2 billion people catalyzing rapid urbanization. Her primary belief, that strongly underlies all her work, is the architect’s role is that of a guardian, he or she is the conscience of the built and unbuilt environment.

Co-sponsored with the India GSD

START
Tue, Apr 21, 2015 at 06:30pm

END
Tue, Apr 21, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Thu, April 16, 2015 - Fri, April 17, 2015  /  Loeb House

South Asia: Local Solutions with Global Impact

Annual Symposium

Workshops to highlight interfacultyresearch projects supported by SAI, and launch of the exhibit and book Mapping the Ephemeral City: Kumbh Mela 2013.

Symposium website and registration.

START
Thu, Apr 16, 2015

END
Fri, Apr 17, 2015

VENUE
Loeb House

ADDRESS
Loeb House, 17 Quincy Street in Cambridge, MA 02138

Thu, April 16, 2015 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  Loeb House

Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Megacity Book Launch and Exhibition

Over fifty Harvard professors, students, administrative staff, and medical practitioners made the pilgrimage to Allahabad, India, to the Kumbh Mela site in 2013, to analyze issues that emerge in any large-scale human gathering. The Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral MEGACITY book and exhibition consolidate research findings and serve as an example of interdisciplinary research conducted at Harvard.

Welcome: Tarun Khanna, Director, Harvard South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Remarks: Drew Faust, President and Lincoln Professor of History, Harvard University

Panel Discussion: One Harvard: Working Across Disciplines

Diana EckProfessor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies, FAS; Member of the Faculty of Divinity, Harvard Divinity School

Tarun KhannaDirector, Harvard South Asia Institute; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School

Jennifer LeaningFrançois-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Planning and Design and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Reception and book sale to follow.

Space is limited. Please RSVP to Meghan Smith, meghansmith@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Background on the Kumbh Mela project.

START
Thu, Apr 16, 2015 at 04:00pm

END
Thu, Apr 16, 2015 at 05:30pm

VENUE
Loeb House

ADDRESS
Loeb House, 17 Quincy Street in Cambridge, MA 02138

Tue, April 14, 2015 from 06:30pm - 08:00pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Conceptualizing The Urban Civic Realm: Insights From The Indian City

Urbanization Seminar

Speaker: Prem Chandavarkar, Managing Partner, CnT Architects.

Chair: Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

It is necessary to distinguish between ‘civic space’ and ‘public space’: the former must embrace inter-personal engagement, whereas the latter need not go beyond the spectacle of the city. The failure to adequately discriminate between the two types of space has led to a global problem: the degeneration of the urban civic realm, with public space largely reduced to the spectacle of leisure and consumption. Third places (as defined by Ray Oldenburg), which formed a strong element of civic glue, are declining as they are getting out priced in a world of globalized capital flows.

The problem becomes specifically acute in the Indian city. Firstly, the challenge is immense: a 70% rural society is expected to transition to being over 50% urban over the next four to five decades, which amounts to over 400 million people becoming urban over this period. Secondly, there is no popular imagination of what a city truly is: the authenticity of culture is located in the village, and the city is seen primarily as a rational economic machine, perceived in terms of infrastructure rather than urbanism. And third, this transition, which has to be achieved with a speed unprecedented in history, cannot be done using the paradigms of the past for they are ecologically unsustainable at the scale of this problem.

The call is being made to respond to this crisis by urgently strengthening the country’s capabilities for urban planning. But the land use plan, which forms a foundation of urban planning, has limited applicability. Bangalore will be used as a case study to compare the impact of land values for the smallest parcel permitted by the land use plan with median incomes of the top to bottom quintiles; the comparison showing that over 40% (a conservative estimate) of the city’s population is out priced by the land use plan. The poor have survived in the Indian city through informal systems of tenure enabled by spaces left by the limited and weak reach of urban planning. The weakness of planning exists at the levels of ideation as well as implementation, and is compounded by the large percentage of building stock that predates master planning. To now extend the reach of urban planning (as it is currently perceived) will set the country on a collision course with social conflict.

The large gap between what current models of planning can do and the reality of the Indian urban condition raises the question of how such a partial and limited perception survives as the dominant mode of representing the city. This is because we do not see the city in terms of human rights. While we may consider human rights as fundamental, the history of universalizing rights is in its infancy, starting with the United Nation’s declaration of 1948. Formal adoption of two subsequent covenants (covering economic, social, cultural, civil, and political rights) took a further 28 years, ending only in 1976.

Rights remain abstract, and become tangible only within a spatial entity that enforces them; and the nation state has been defined as that appropriate entity. But in most cases the nation state is too complex an entity to do this effectively. It plays a role in constitutionally defining rights and setting up mechanisms for redressing their violation. But it is too distant for rights to be woven into the protocols of daily life. For this human rights must also be tangible at the level of the city and the village.

But rights are also tied to citizenship. Our current definition of citizenship is predicated on stability in space, which exists at the level of the nation state as mobility is constrained by the rules of immigration. This cannot be done at the level of the city, for urbanism thrives on mobility. The failure to adequately consider citizenship and human rights allows inequity and exclusiveness to permeate conceptualizations of the city. One needs to develop an alternative notion of citizenship: one that is not tied so much to spatial stability, but more toward enabling capabilities for engagement in the civic realm. The lecture will end with an attempt to define a framework for this notion of citizenship – particularly in terms of the urban condition’s ability to accommodate equity, scale, legibility, freedom, flexibility, context and memory.

An attempt to tackle the crisis that is apparent in the Indian city can become a precedent for a global re-conceptualization of the urban civic realm.

Co-sponsored with the India GSD

START
Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 06:30pm

END
Tue, Apr 14, 2015 at 08:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA