Click to Subscribe & Stay Informed via Email!

Subscribe Here!

Subscribe and stay informed about our latest news and events!
  • Please List your Professional Affiliation
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Upcoming SAI Events


Wed, February 22, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Religion, Ethics, and Nascent Nationalism and the Partition

Partition Seminar

Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Given that Partition is widely considered to have resulted due to religious differences, it is critical to explore the interplay between religion and nationalism in pre-Partition rhetoric, in the post-Partition riots, and in the actual migration process. It is interesting, also, to explore, the historical root of the idea of a separate Muslim homeland, as well as histories of multi-faith society in India.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar. | Facebook Event

START
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 22, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0215 Asani
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Thu, February 23, 2017 from 07:30pm - 11:00pm  /  Dubai, UAE

Remembering Faiz: A tribute to the great poet

Special Event

Poetic Strokes is proud to join hands with South Asia Institute at Harvard University in bringing “Remembering Faiz – A tribute” to Dubai.

Grandson of Faiz, Adeel Hashmi will recite his poetry along with some other performances by the award winner Sonam Kalra and Asad Anees – The Virtuoso Pianist.

Event is on THURSDAY, February 23, 2017, at Emirates international auditorium at Emirates International school, Jumeriah.

Tickets available (priced at AED 250)  https://dubai.platinumlist.net/event-tickets/43117/remembering-faiz?show=44153

Seats are limited.

For further information please call 050 4216601 or 050 3839586.

Cosponsored with Poetic Strokes.

Join the Facebook event.

START
Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 07:30pm

END
Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 11:00pm

VENUE
Dubai, UAE

ADDRESS
Dubai, UAE

Faiz-Flyer (1)
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Tue, February 28, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Strength in Numbers: How Women’s Networks Close India’s Political Gender Gap

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Soledad PrillamanPh.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

START
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

person-690245_960_720
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, March 1, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition / Crowd Sourcing

Partition Seminar

5:00 – 6:00 PM: The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition

Prashant Bharadwaj, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego

This paper examines how areas affected by the partition fare in the long run. Using migrant presence as a proxy for the intensity of the impact of the partition, and district level data on agricultural output between 1911-2009, we find that areas that received more migrants have higher average yields, are more likely to take up high yielding varieties (HYV) of seeds, and are more likely to use agricultural technologies. These correlations are more pronounced after the Green Revolution in India. Using pre-partition data, we show that migrant placement is uncorrelated with soil conditions, agricultural infrastructure, and agricultural yields prior to 1947; hence, the effects are not solely explained by selective migration into districts with a higher potential for agricultural development. Migrants moving to India were more educated than both the natives who stayed and the migrants who moved out. Given the positive association of education with the adoption of high yielding varieties of seeds we highlight the presence of educated migrants during the timing of the Green Revolution as a potential pathway for the observed effects.

6:00 – 7:00 PM: Crowd Sourcing 

Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

This part of the project is focusing on oral accounts of the Partition. They are attempting to build a comprehensive database of oral histories through crowd-sourcing, and the use of modern techniques to collect, analyze, and store information from an individual’s experience. The aim is to preserve the rightful spot of these stories in history and give a voice to the realities experienced in the data and surrounding research. The project will enrich the descriptive picture of the event and extend the implications of these stories to understand consequences today.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0301 Prashant Karim
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Sat, March 4, 2017  /  Harvard University

Mumbai: Research + Projections Social Sciences and Spatial Thinking

Special Event

Featuring new and largely unpublished work, this one-day conference sets up a dialogue between designers and social scientists. By connecting fine-grained micro studies with broader imaginations for the metropolitan region, we intend to open up new scalar possibilities for Mumbai.

Cosponsored with Harvard Mellon Urban Initiative.

Enter the conference website and register.

Poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, March 6, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Dastangoi: The art of Urdu storytelling

Muslim Societies in South Asia Seminar

Ankit Chadha, Storyteller / Author

Chair: Ali Asani, Professor of Indo-Muslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, Harvard University

Dastangoi, the lost art of Urdu storytelling, developed in eighth century A.D. around the adventures of an Arab hero, Amir Hamza. These stories became very popular in the 19th century North India. With the demise of the last known exponent of the art form in 1928, Mir Baqar Ali, the form also died with him. The modern revival has seen not just the performance of the traditional stories from the Hamza dastan, but also the adaptations of more local and contemporary themes. Ankit Chadha, a writer and storyteller, has been a practitioner of Dastangoi since 2010. His writing varies from biographical accounts of personalities like Kabir, Rahim, Dara Shikoh and Majaaz to modern folk tales on corporate culture, internet and mobile technology. Ankit also has works for young audiences and has worked on Urdu adaptations of children’s classics; including Alice and The Little Prince. He is the author of the award-winning book for children, My Gandhi Story, and the recently released, Amir Khusrau – The Man in Riddles.

 

START
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0306 Chadha
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, March 8, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition of British India: Cities and Settlements

Partition Seminar

TBD

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0126 Partition Seminars_
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, March 10, 2017 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

The Lessons Private Schools Teach: Using a Field Experiment to Understand the Effects of Private Schools on Political Behavior

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Emmerich Davies Escobar, Assistant Professor of Education, Harvard University Graduate School of Education 

Bryce Millett Steinberg, Postdoctoral Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Brown University

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

START
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Mar 10, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

thumbnail_3-10-17--Escobar--11x17
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, March 10, 2017  /  Harvard Graduate School of Design

A World of Women Villages

Cosponsored Event

February 6 – March 10 2017
Harvard Graduate School of Design, 2nd Floor Exhibition Wall

Ashley C. Thompson, Design Studies in Risk and Resilience, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Curated from a collection of portraits of women and girls taken over more than 25 years of global travel, the exhibition presents ten portraits of women in rural villages from Nepal, Bhutan, Peru, and French Guiana. Accompanied by description and personal narrative, the work draws attention to a gendered global phenomenon: boys and men departing their homes and families, while the women remain.

The resulting distortion of the gender demographic across geographies and cultures is startling – villages everywhere seemingly inhabited only by women, children, and the elderly or impaired. Capturing the journey and imagination, of an American woman raised nomadically, the exhibition intimately frames her encounters with these girls and women and the realities they face, so drastically different from her own, incorporated into her own story of self.

START
Fri, Mar 10, 2017

END
Fri, Mar 10, 2017

VENUE
Harvard Graduate School of Design
Harvard University

ADDRESS
48 Quincy St,
Cambridge, MA

WWVExhibitionFlyer
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, March 20, 2017 from 04:15pm - 07:15pm  /  CGIS South, S250

Film Screening: Baghban

Cosponsored Event

An elderly couple wish their children to care for them in their old age. But their children see and treat them as a burden, and they must struggle to regain their worth and dignity to themselves and others.

Cosponsored with Asia Center

START
Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 04:15pm

END
Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 07:15pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S250
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Baghban
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, March 22, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

1971 Partition

Partition Seminar

Martha Chen, Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, Affiliated Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and International Coordinator of the global research-policy-action network Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO)

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0126 Partition Seminars_
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, March 29, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition of British India: 70 Years Later

Partition Seminar

Tarun Khanna, Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School; Director, Harvard South Asia Institute

Asim Khwaja, Sumitomo-FASID Professor of International Finance and Development, Harvard Kennedy School

This seminar will focus on the current relations between India and Pakistan, including the tension over Kashmir, the Indus Valley treaty, movement between the two countries. Other topics will be discussed, such as The Land Boundary Agreement between India and Bangladesh and transfer of villages in 2015.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 29, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 29, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0126 Partition Seminars_
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, April 5, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Coins as Historical Puzzles: Examples from Ancient India

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Pankaj Tandon, Associate Professor of Economics, Boston University

Chair: Sunil AmrithMehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

Coins are small metallic documents of the past. In the images and legends impressed upon them, they contain clues that can give us insights into the times in which they were created and used. In this talk, examples from ancient India will be used to show how the unpuzzling of these clues can help us bring back forgotten dynasties, recreate historical events and shine a light on political and economic conditions.

START
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0004185_india-denomination-set-of-10-coins
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, April 7, 2017 from 02:00pm - 04:00pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Enfranchising Your Own? Experimental Evidence on Bureaucrat Diversity and Election Bias

Joint Seminar on South Asian Politics

Yusuf Neggers, Postdoctoral Fellow, Watson Institute, Brown University

Simon Chauchard, Assistant Professor of Government Department, Dartmouth College

Chair: Ashutosh Varshney, Sol Goldman Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Director of the Brown-India Initiative

Cosponsored with the Center for Contemporary South Asia at the Wat­son Insti­tute at Brown Uni­ver­sity, the Weath­er­head Cen­ter for Inter­na­tional Affairs, and the MIT Cen­ter for Interna­tional Studies

START
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 02:00pm

END
Fri, Apr 7, 2017 at 04:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

4-7-17--Neggers--11x17
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, April 12, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

“Our Clothes, Our Hair, We Don’t Care”: Prince and the British South Asian misfits

South Asia Without Borders Seminar

Hasit Shah, Research Affiliate, Harvard South Asia Institute

Chair: Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies at Harvard University

When Prince passed away in April 2016, at the age of just 57, many people felt profound sadness at the loss of an artist whose performative genius was such that people from all backgrounds and lifestyles felt included in his world. SAI Research Affiliate Hasit Shah – journalist, Londoner and Prince fan – explores the connections between a group of second-generation British South Asians and a musician they too claimed as one of their own.

This event was originally schedule for February 6. 

START
Wed, Apr 12, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Apr 12, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0412_Hasit_Update
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

SAI Events Archive


Wed, February 15, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Gender and the Partition

Partition Seminar

Catherine WarnerCollege Fellow in South Asian Studies and History, Harvard University

When Partition is viewed from the lens of gender history, what happens? Is this the same history with women’s voices added and silences interpreted, or does it offer alternate scales and geographies? To what extent did Partition shape the gendering of citizenship in South Asia? This seminar will examine how narratives of gendered violence have been collected, read, and interpreted in Partition historiography. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to survey the state of the field and consider possibilities for future research on citizenship, gender, coercion and mobility in post-colonial South Asia.

Light refreshments will be served.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30. All are welcome.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event

START
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0215 Warner
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, February 15, 2017 from 07:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

Special Event

About the group discussion:

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Feb. 15. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

Add to your calendar.

START
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

Discussion Group_Partition
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Mon, February 13, 2017 from 05:00pm - 06:30pm  /  CGIS South, S030

Debrief Nepal: Reflections on an In-Country Rapid Planning Exercise on Earthquake Preparedness

Special Event

Jerold Kayden, Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Sarita Maskey, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Urban Development, Nepal Government

Shriju Pradhan, Deputy Director, Kathmandu Metropolitan City, Government of Nepal

David Sanderson, Judith Nielsen Chair, University of New South Wales

Anshu Sharma, Co-founder and Chief Mentor, SEEDS

Although scientists can say with near certainty that a major earthquake will strike the Kathmandu Valley in the future, they cannot predict with certainty when that major earthquake will strike.  Such uncertainty generates another kind of uncertainty, about what to do now, in the near term, and in the long term.  It can even facilitate delays in needed decision-making.  Nepali stakeholders, drawn from government, civil society, and the private sector, joined several outside participants in a just-completed one-day exercise using rapid scenario planning methods to unlock implementable ideas for securing an earthquake-resilient Kathmandu Valley. They will report on the outcome of the working exercise during this panel discussion.

Reception to Follow

This initiative is part of the Harvard South Asia Institute’s Nepal Studies Program, launched with generous support from Jeffrey M. Smith.

In partnership with University of New South Wales, Tribhuwan University, Kathmandu University, and the Harvard Asia Center

Join the conversation: #DebriefNepal.

START
Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 06:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S030
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0213_Nepal Debrief__
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, February 10, 2017 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  Kathmandu, Nepal

Debrief Nepal: Reflections on a Rapid Scenario Planning Exercise on Earthquake Preparedness

Special Event

Jerold Kayden, Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Sarita Maskey, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Urban Development, Nepal Government

Shriju Pradhan, Deputy Director, Kathmandu Metropolitan City, Government of Nepal

David Sanderson, Judith Nielsen Chair, University of New South Wales

Anshu Sharma, Co-founder and Chief Mentor, SEEDS

Although scientists can say with near certainty that a major earthquake will strike the Kathmandu Valley in the future, they cannot predict with certainty when that major earthquake will strike.  Such uncertainty generates another kind of uncertainty, about what to do now, in the near term, and in the long term.  It can even facilitate delays in needed decision-making.  Nepali stakeholders, drawn from government, civil society, and the private sector, joined several outside participants in a just-completed one-day exercise using rapid scenario and other planning methods to unlock implementable ideas for securing an earthquake-resilient Kathmandu Valley. They will report on the outcome of the working exercise during this panel discussion.

High Tea to Follow

This initiative is part of the Harvard South Asia Institute’s Nepal Studies Program, launched with generous support from Jeffrey M. Smith.

In partnership with University of New South Wales, Tribhuwan University, Kathmandu University, and Harvard Alumni Group of Nepal

Join the conversation: #DebriefNepal.

START
Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 05:30pm

END
Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
Hotel Yak & Yeti

ADDRESS
Durbar Marg

0210_SAI_Nepal Debrief
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Fri, February 10, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:30pm  /  Starr Auditorium

Film Screening and Q+A with Deepa Mehta: Anatomy of Violence

Film Screening

Deepa Mehta, Filmmaker

Deepa Mehta will be screening her latest movie ‘The Anatomy of Violence’ on the sidelines of the India Conference. The screening will be followed by a Q&A session with Ms. Deepa Mehta, a UN representative, Harvard student activist Gulika Reddy, and Harvard Professor Jacqueline Bhabha

Celebrated filmmaker Deepa Mehta investigates one of India’s most notorious crimes — the 2012 gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old woman on a Delhi bus — in her angry, impassioned and essential new film.

In December 2012, a 23-year-old woman and her friend got on a private bus in Delhi. The men already on board — five passengers and the bus driver — gang-raped the woman, beat her friend, and threw them onto the street. The woman died of her injuries two weeks later. The case made worldwide news and was instrumental in activating Indian policy discussions about women’s rights and the government’s duty to prosecute for rape.

Deepa Mehta’s Anatomy of Violence takes a fearless approach to the topic. In collaboration with theatre artist Neelam Mansingh Chowdhry, Mehta worked improvisationally with her actors to envisage possible sociological and psychological backgrounds and pasts for the perpetrators and the victim. The film posits formative events in the men’s lives, imagining the origins of their violent, remorseless personalities, while presenting the woman’s life in parallel.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating will be first come first serve.

Facebook event.

START
Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
Starr Auditorium
Harvard Kennedy School

ADDRESS
Harvard Kennedy School, 79 J.F.Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA

Anatomy of Violence Poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Thu, February 9, 2017 from 12:00pm - 01:30pm  /  Common Room, 2 Divinity Ave.

“Argaḍa” and “Nirargaḍa”

Cosponsored Event

Liu Zhen, Professor, National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies, Fudan University; Visiting Scholar, Harvard-Yenching Institute

Chair/Discussant: Michael Witzel, Wales Professor of Sanskrit, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

This talk will offer a short introduction to the Sanskrit word “argaḍa” and its antonym “nirargaḍa”. The word “argaḍa” first appears in Brāhmaṇa literature to refer to a bolt that locks a cowshed. The word continued to be used in post-Vedic literature, including Hindu, Buddhist, and Jainist texts in which it refers to a bolt used on the door of a house or city gate. A more detailed description of an argaḍa is, however, found in the technical texts and its image is found in works of art. “Argaḍa” and its antonym “nirargaḍa” later became a paired metaphor used in a religious context. In addition to this pair of words, this presentation will discuss the related compound “nirargaḍamedha,” which means a kind of sacrifice.

Liu Zhen studied Indology, Tibetology and Sinology at Universität-München, Germany from 2001-2008. He is currently a professor in the National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies, and Director of the Center for Gandhian and Indian Studies, at Fudan University. His research specialties are Veda and Vedic literature, comparisons between Chinese and Indian literature, Indian Mahā- and Hīna-yāna Buddhism, comparisons of Indian, Tibetan and Chinese Buddhist documents, Sanskrit manuscripts and Indian and Central Asian art.

Cosponsored with Harvard Yenching Institute

START
Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 12:00pm

END
Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 01:30pm

VENUE
Common Room, 2 Divinity Ave.

ADDRESS
Common Room, 2 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA

Poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, February 8, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS Knafel, K262

Citizenship Denied: A Microhistory of Indian Immigration in the Early Twentieth Century

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Hardeep Dhillon, PhD Candidate, Dept. of History, Harvard University; SAI Graduate Student Associate

Discussants:

Sunil Amrith, Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies, Harvard University

Sugata Bose, Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, Harvard University

In the early twentieth century, immigration from Asia to the U.S. propelled local, national, and global questions on race, labor, imperialism, and citizenship. This talk will present a microhistory of these events.

START
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS Knafel, K262
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA 02138

0208_Hardeep UPDATE
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Wed, February 8, 2017 from 05:30pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Historical and Humanitarian Consequences of Migration

The seminar will take place in CGIS S050, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA.

Partition Seminar

Jennifer Leaning, François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

The seminar will explore the story of the mass migration of Hindus/Sikhs and Muslims from Pakistan and India respectively into the other country and the resulting humanitarian crisis. Professor Leaning will analyze: the Boundary Commission’s work, the patterns of migration, and unprecedented sectarian violence, including massacres, physical violence, and destruction of property. Leaning will also consider ethics and mechanics of care provided as part of immediate relief. Special attention will be focused on the role played by the main players during and after Partition, including the key political parties and individuals. Erum Sattar, SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School, will provide insights into how water issues relate to Partition.

Light refreshments will be served.

From 5 to 5:30, we will be hosting a group discussion about the SAI initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of Partition in crowd proportions. The goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. All are welcome to attend the discussion.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Add to your calendar | Facebook Event

#SAIPartition

START
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 05:30pm

END
Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0208 JL poster
Share Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn