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News Category: News


Partition Stories: Collection and Analysis of Oral Narratives


This project is a part of a larger research study called, Looking Back, Informing the Future – The 1947 Partition of British India.

Goals of the Partition Stories Project:

  • Preserve and enrich the historical knowledge of Partition in crowd proportions,
  • Discover the different yet merging perspectives of the largest migration in history,
  • Analyze the past and prevailing rhetoric surrounding the Partition,
  • Provide free access to the stories through the Harvard SAI Partition portal.

The project is being co-led by Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, and Tarun Khanna, Director of the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute at Harvard University; Jorge Paulo Lemann Professor, Harvard Business School.

The three month pilot phase included a collection of 350 stories from the sub-continent and United States. The preliminary analysis can be viewed in Professor Khanna’s presentation at the World Economic Forum in China, this summer.

The project hopes to contribute to the scholarship around the events that led to the largest involuntary migration in recent history. In addition, it will inform scholarship about, and policies related to, other such societal schisms, subsequent to that time, and those occurring today.

We aim to collect stories, reflections, memories, or experiences through crowdsourcing as well as through an online survey.

You can share your story here.

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Fall class: Contemporary Developing Countries: Entrepreneurial Solutions to Social and Economic Problems in the Developing World (SW47)


 

The primary objective of the course is to engage students with the modern day challenges affecting developing countries, and to examine a range of entrepreneurial attempts to solve these problems.

The course focuses on several categories of social and economic problems, with specific focus on the realms of Education, Health, and Financial Inclusion.

The goal is to understand ways in which entrepreneurial action can effectively tackle major socioeconomic problems in developing countries, by combining knowledge of historical causes, qualitative and quantitative evidence, and context-specific knowledge of the commonalities and differences across nations.

The class will address all developing countries, with a significant amount of course material set in South Asia. No prior knowledge of any specific region is required.

 

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Does the Fight for Working Women’s Rights in India Leave Out Informal Workers?


Tata Trusts and Harvard University South Asia Institute (SAI) recently embarked on a collaborative journey in knowledge creation and capacity building for social and economic empowerment in India. The 18-month research project titled, Livelihood Creation in India through Social Entrepreneurship and Skill Development (beginning October 2015) was the first step in this direction. The project focused on three key areas including rural livelihood creation (emphasis on the handicrafts and handloom sectors); educational, social and economic empowerment of women; and science and technology-based interventions for poverty alleviation.

There is consensus that India’s future growth depends in part on addressing the severe current deficit in gender equality. Much work has been done to address this discrimination through legislation, social policy, grass roots organizing, educational targeting, and public sector training. Despite the imperative of higher education as a preparation for engagement in a skill based global economy, only 6% of rural girls make it to college. 46%of Indian girls are still married before they are 18, and 16% experience their first pregnancy before they are 15 years old. At the same time, sexual violence against women continues to be reported at high levels—every third Indian woman between the ages of 15 and 49 years has experienced sexual or physical violence during her lifetime. Women are severely underrepresented in leadership positions in industry, academia, and government.

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2017 SAI Symposium: Life Sciences Panel [VIDEO]


The fascinating life sciences panel at the 2017 Symposium featured:

Parvathi Sreekumar: a bioscientist based at the Department of Crop Physiology, University of Agricultural Sciences in Bangalore. She is a member of the inaugural cohort of SAI’s Boston Bangalore Biosciences Beginnings (B4) Program and is spending a year at Harvard as a postdoctoral fellow.

Muhammad H. Zaman: Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor of Biomedical Engineering and International Health at Boston University. He is using quantitative tools to understand tumor metastasis, developing robust technologies for high-value healthcare problems in the developing world, particularly in the area of maternal and child health and working on health and innovation policy issues in developing nations.

Conor WalshJohn L. Loeb Associate Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the John A. Paulson Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.

Venki Murthy: Professor of Molecular & Cellular Biology and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Neurobiology at Harvard University.

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American Council for Southern Asian Art Symposium XVIII


ACSAA Symposium web banner

October 12 – October 15, 2017

Harvard South Asia Institute is proud to co-sponsor the biennial American Council for Southern Asian Art Symposium. ACSAA symposia serve as opportunities to meet colleagues, reconnect with mentors and graduate school cohorts, and share one’s current research with the field. From senior scholars to graduate students, ACSAA symposia are one of the primary ways ACSAA members gather and support one another, share ideas with a group of like-minded colleagues, and participate in the ACSAA community. We are looking forward to welcoming you all in Boston/Cambridge, MA!

ACSAA 2017 Organizers

Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture
Laura Weinstein, Ananda K. Coomaraswamy curator of South Asian and Islamic Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

About the ACSAA

The American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the study and awareness of the art of South and Southeast Asia and the Himalayan regions. In addition to periodic symposia, usually held every two years, ACSAA pursues these goals through various projects, including its annual bulletin, bibliographies, a color slide project, a microfiche archive and outreach materials. Since its incorporation in 1967, ACSAA has grown from its original fifteen members to an organization of some three hundred individuals and institutions. ACSAA is formally affiliated with the College Art Association (CAA) and the Association of Asian Studies (AAS).

 

For more information about this conference, please visit our website: http://southasiainstitute.harvard.edu/acsaa2017/

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Congratulations, Class of 2017!


Here at SAI, we are wishing the young minds of tomorrow the very best as they celebrate their triumphs, diligence, and vigor. Happy commencement!
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(PC: Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer)

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