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Mission

The Harvard University South Asia Institute (SAI) engages faculty and students through interdisciplinary programs to advance and deepen the teaching and research on global issues relevant to South Asia. 

About SAI | View the South Asia Institute video

Upcoming Events


Tue, February 28, 2017 from 04:00pm - 05:30pm  /  CGIS South, S153

Strength in Numbers: How Women’s Networks Close India’s Political Gender Gap

Graduate Student Associate Seminar

Soledad PrillamanPh.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University; Graduate Student Associate, SAI

Discussant: Zeynep Pamuk, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Government, Harvard University

In India there persists a striking gender gap in political participation and representation, despite several decades of targeted policy interventions. Women’s political participation is important not only on normative grounds of inclusion, but because we know that when women do participate, politics changes. Prillaman presents a theoretical model of political behavior in rural India which argues that women’s lack of political participation is the result of coordinated political behavior in the household. Prillaman then argues and shows that women’s access to networks of other women is one channel through which we can see a shift towards a gender-inclusive equilibrium, even when resource allocations, social norms, and household dynamics would suggest otherwise.

START
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 04:00pm

END
Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 05:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S153
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

0228 Prillaman
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Wed, March 1, 2017 from 05:00pm - 07:00pm  /  CGIS South, S050

The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition / Crowd Sourcing Memories

Partition Seminar

5:00 – 6:00 PM: The Short and Long Run Impacts of the Partition

Prashant Bharadwaj, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego

This paper examines how areas affected by the partition fare in the long run. Using migrant presence as a proxy for the intensity of the impact of the partition, and district level data on agricultural output between 1911-2009, we find that areas that received more migrants have higher average yields, are more likely to take up high yielding varieties (HYV) of seeds, and are more likely to use agricultural technologies. These correlations are more pronounced after the Green Revolution in India. Using pre-partition data, we show that migrant placement is uncorrelated with soil conditions, agricultural infrastructure, and agricultural yields prior to 1947; hence, the effects are not solely explained by selective migration into districts with a higher potential for agricultural development. Migrants moving to India were more educated than both the natives who stayed and the migrants who moved out. Given the positive association of education with the adoption of high yielding varieties of seeds we highlight the presence of educated migrants during the timing of the Green Revolution as a potential pathway for the observed effects.

6:00 – 7:00 PM: Crowd Sourcing Memories of Partition

Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

This part of the project is focusing on oral accounts of the Partition. They are attempting to build a comprehensive database of oral histories through crowd-sourcing, and the use of modern techniques to collect, analyze, and store information from an individual’s experience. The aim is to preserve the rightful spot of these stories in history and give a voice to the realities experienced in the data and surrounding research. The project will enrich the descriptive picture of the event and extend the implications of these stories to understand consequences today.

Light refreshments will be served.

Following this seminar, we are hosting a Focus Group Discussion from 7 – 7:30 about the project. All are welcome.

Seminar resources.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

See a full list of Partition seminars.

Facebook EventAdd to your calendar.

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 05:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0301 Prashant Karim
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Wed, March 1, 2017 from 07:00pm - 07:30pm  /  CGIS South, S050

Partition Project: Focus Group Discussion

Please join us after the Seminar Series event for a brief group discussion to share reflections on the presentation. The newest initiative, the 1947 Partition Stories ‘Looking Back’ project, is a collaborative effort to extend the lessons from Partition into today. Our goal is to reflect on how the consequences of Partition have manifested and extend these questions into the future. We will be welcoming any thoughts and direction from the group.

About the crowd sourcing project:

The project is part of an initiative to create an accessible archive to digitize the stories, records, and reflections of the 1947 Partition of British India in crowd proportions. Our goal is to create an online community inviting personal and shared memories of Partition to preserve the realities experienced and enrich the historical knowledge of the event. We aim to use the history shared in this community to tell the true story of the societal effects of the largest migration in history.

This group discussion will take place directly after the Partition Seminar on Mar. 1. Attendance of the seminar is not required.

This series, part of the SAI research project ‘Looking Back, Informing the Future: The 1947 Partition of British India – Implications of Mass Dislocations Across Geographies’ will explore issues that have often been ignored in the context of the Partition as well as discuss their relevance and impact today, both in South Asia and in other parts of the world. Through two-hour seminars spread over eight sessions, faculty, students, and community members will be brought together to explore the various facets of this complex historic event.

START
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:00pm

END
Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 07:30pm

VENUE
CGIS South, S050
Harvard University

ADDRESS
1730 Cambridge Street
Cambridge MA

0126 Partition Seminars_
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Sat, March 4, 2017  /  Harvard University

Mumbai: Research + Projections Social Sciences and Spatial Thinking

Special Event

Featuring new and largely unpublished work, this one-day conference sets up a dialogue between designers and social scientists. By connecting fine-grained micro studies with broader imaginations for the metropolitan region, we intend to open up new scalar possibilities for Mumbai.

Cosponsored with Harvard Mellon Urban Initiative.

Enter the conference website and register.

Poster
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News


Highlights from the Harvard India Conference

The two-day Harvard student event, hosted at the Harvard Business School and Harvard Kennedy School, brought together business leaders, entertainment professionals, and many other leaders to engage in a conversation about India’s path to global leadership.

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Looking back, informing the future: Reflections on Partition

On Feb. 3, SAI hosted a discussion forum in Delhi to facilitate a personalized dialogue about Partition. Professor Uma Chakravarti, who moderated the discussion, showed how these stories connect to the present and inform our understanding of history, nation, community, and religion.

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International Photo Contest Winners

Congratulations to Harvard College students Bharath Venkatesh ’17 and Marisa Houlahan ’17, who were chosen by SAI as winners of the Office of International Education’s Annual International Photo Contest for their photos taken in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

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Research Assistant needed: South and Southeast Asian Art

Professor Jinah Kim (History of Art & Architecture) is looking for a Research Assistant to help her with various research projects, which includes an exhibition on Nepalese Buddhist art, a visual database project, a bibliographic project on the history of Indian painting, and a symposium on South and Southeast Asian Art.

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A fruitful trip to India

Naren Tallapragada, Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Francesco Wiedemann, MIT, were the inaugural winners of SAI’s 2016 Seed for Change Competition for their venture gomango, which provides low-cost refrigerated transport to food producers in India. They spent December in India.

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SAI responds to Executive Order

We offer our full support to Harvard students, faculty, staff and affiliates, regardless of their country of origin or religious background, alongside the Harvard International Office and the university’s Global Support Services.

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A new way to detect fake medicines

Fake, substandard, and otherwise compromised medicines are a deadly problem in South Asia and globally. Dr. Muhammad Zaman, visiting faculty at SAI, is working to develop a low-cost, portable and fast way to measure a drug’s purity.

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